The New Official Plan

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The City of Ottawa's Official Plan provides a vision for the future growth of the city and a policy framework to guide the city's physical development. In 2019, the City of Ottawa is beginning a multi-year process to develop a new Official Plan. This page will be your hub for all updates, proposed policy and opportunities to provide feedback.

Below you will see an Updates and Engage section. Updates will be where you can get all new information on the Official Plan, for example any FAQ's, blogs, and draft policies.

After reviewing the information provided, we invite you to participate through the different feedback opportunities in the Engage section. Both sections will be continuously updated throughout the Official Plan process.

This website is also a tool to support residents' engaging their communities in the new Official Plan. Check out the Toolkit section to get a step by step guide for reaching new people in the Official Plan process.

The City of Ottawa's Official Plan provides a vision for the future growth of the city and a policy framework to guide the city's physical development. In 2019, the City of Ottawa is beginning a multi-year process to develop a new Official Plan. This page will be your hub for all updates, proposed policy and opportunities to provide feedback.

Below you will see an Updates and Engage section. Updates will be where you can get all new information on the Official Plan, for example any FAQ's, blogs, and draft policies.

After reviewing the information provided, we invite you to participate through the different feedback opportunities in the Engage section. Both sections will be continuously updated throughout the Official Plan process.

This website is also a tool to support residents' engaging their communities in the new Official Plan. Check out the Toolkit section to get a step by step guide for reaching new people in the Official Plan process.

Have a question about the draft New Official Plan? Please feel free to ask your question here. We will endeavor to answer your questions within 3 business days.

Ask us your draft New Official Plan question below:

Q&A

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    What is a ‘Hub’ and a ‘Corridor’ and where are they located?

    10 days ago

    The draft Official Plan adopts a transect approach which divides the City of Ottawa into six concentric transect areas, moving from the urban Downtown Core out to the Rural area of the City. Each transect area sets out policies to reflect the existing and intended scale of construction and design of the area as it develops. 

    Within any given transect, there are both Corridor and Hub areas. Hubs are designated areas that are within easy walking distance from existing or future rapid-transit stations and frequent street transit stops.  Hubs are sub-centres distributed across the city. They linked to one another and to downtown by rapid transit and serve several neighbourhoods. They are intended for the greatest densities of employment and housing, to sustain areas that are mixed-use, compact, and that prioritize the experience of pedestrians, cyclists, and transit users. As areas with the densest development spurred by easy transit access to the City, Hubs help provide ridership to support the rapid-transit system. 

    Hub designations include existing transit stations and dense developments like Tunney’s Pasture, Confederation Heights, and Kanata Centrum. In addition, there are Hubs around planned stations in new growing communities like Riverside South. 

    Corridors are policy designation areas that run along many important streets and are intended to foster a mix of uses, including employment and housing, easily accessible on foot or by transit.  They represent areas intended for a higher density and scale of development than the interior of nearby neighbourhoods. Corridors are divided into: Mainstreet Corridors, which are the longest and most important ones and are intended for the greatest amount of variety of services and housing at a larger scale and with broader reach; and Minor Corridors, which are important in their neighbourhood but not necessarily at the level of the whole city, and are intended for a greater emphasis on additional residential choices and neighbourhood-supportive commercial uses. Minor corridors are also given lower height maximums than Mainstreet corridors in the same Transect but are expected to have slightly taller and denser development. Minor corridors are served by frequent bus routes that feed into O-Train or Transitway stations.  Mainstreet Corridors include streets like Wellington Street West, Bank Street, Rideau Street or Baseline Road. Minor Corridors include streets like Maitland Ave., Churchill Ave., Laurier Avenue East or Donald Street.
     

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    What is “intensification” and how is it different than “regeneration”?

    10 days ago

    “Intensification” is a planning term used to describe the development of a property, site or area at a higher density than what currently exists. The property, site or area can be vacant, within an existing developed neighbourhood, or underutilized, such as a parking lot.

    “Regeneration” is a new term proposed in the draft Official Plan that includes the concept of “intensification” above but also the relationship of the new development to its surrounding and future context. “Intensification” typically only considers the numerical increase of development, either residential or commercial. “Regeneration” is about how a neighbourhood will evolve over time including housing options, housing design, commercial development and sustainability, the protection of the tree canopy, access to greenspace, and community facilities such as schools, parks, community and recreational centres, roads, transit and pathways.