Lansdowne 2.0

Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin Email this link

Background

Lansdowne is a place of history and civic pride. For over 175 years, it has been a gathering place for neighbours, residents of Eastern Ontario and Western Québec, and for tourists from across Canada and around the world. It is a place of connection and celebration for sports, cultural and community events.

In 2012, City Council entered into a 30-year partnership (now a 40-year partnership) with the Ottawa Sports and Entertainment Group (OSEG) for the renewal and revitalization of Lansdowne with a new South Stadium Stands, new mixed-use retail and reimagined public realm spaces and subterranean parking.

In

Background

Lansdowne is a place of history and civic pride. For over 175 years, it has been a gathering place for neighbours, residents of Eastern Ontario and Western Québec, and for tourists from across Canada and around the world. It is a place of connection and celebration for sports, cultural and community events.

In 2012, City Council entered into a 30-year partnership (now a 40-year partnership) with the Ottawa Sports and Entertainment Group (OSEG) for the renewal and revitalization of Lansdowne with a new South Stadium Stands, new mixed-use retail and reimagined public realm spaces and subterranean parking.

In December 2020, City Council directed a working group made up of City and OSEG representatives to consider options to enhance the sustainability and long-term financial viability of Lansdowne’s operations and the Partnership.

In July 2021, Council agreed to move forward with the recommended Framework as described in the staff report.

Staff were asked to bring forward detailed plans and cost estimates for the revitalization of Lansdowne Park including a funding strategy for the City’s portion; an assessment of revenue neutrality and assessment of the financial implications for the City for the term of the Partnership agreement

Since July 2021, City Staff and OSEG have done due diligence to review the formal business case, reviewed financial projections and proformas, assessed feasibility of affordable housing, undertake geotechnical work and hydrogeological investigations, and develop a class D estimate for the project.

Proposal

The proposal celebrates and honours the storied history of Lansdowne as a bedrock of Ottawa’s civic, cultural and sports identify while presenting a generational opportunity to renew and transform these city assets.

Using the Lansdowne Guiding Principles as the framework, the proposal also builds on the collaboration and vision that has guided development at Lansdowne to date. These Guiding Principles, developed in 2010 by the City, National Capital Commission (NCC), Parks Canada and OSEG in consultation with the public, envision a site that reflects the history, unique location and role of Lansdowne as a year-round gathering place for our Capital City. Lansdowne 2.0 is consistent with these Guiding Principles and represents an important next step in achieving the vision for this site.

The proposal is to demolish the existing North Stadium Stands and arena complex, and build a new, world-class Event Centre and North Stadium Stands. This new public infrastructure will make the venues accessible, sustainable, and better position Lansdowne as an iconic, landmark site. New retail podium and additional residential units are also included within the proposal. In line with the City’s Official Plan, the residential component will bring additional density to Lansdowne, while providing a significant part of the funding envelope for Lansdowne 2.0.

Below are the highlights from the proposal:

Concept Plan

  • Council was asked to “approve in principle” the proposed concept plan. This means that the concept plan may be subject to change as we go through the consultation process.
  • OSEG has provided a proposal and concept plan to create a new state-of-the-art Event Centre with 5,500 seats that will support an expansion of local events, concerts, and markets.
  • Reconstruction of the North Side Stands to replace the aging infrastructure and rebuild it to the latest accessibility standards.

Overarching Financial Key Messages

  • The project is affordable and self-financing. There is no additional cost to Ottawa taxpayers.
  • It is revenue neutral, meaning there are sufficient additional revenue sources to fund the total cost of this project including the financing costs.

Rationale for Air Rights proposal

  • By following the same process as was done during the initial redevelopment, with oversight by a Fairness Commissioner, staff believe the sale or lease of these air rights creates significant added value by generating revenue to offset the project costs and helps to make the overall business case affordable to the City.
  • The City commissioned an external appraisal firm to assess the land sale prices on a per square foot of anticipated development density. CREO’s internal appraisers reviewed the findings and reconciled the data in relation to the OSEG proposal. Based on the preliminary plans showing an anticipated development density of 850,000 square feet the estimate of market value attributable to the residential development air rights is $43.5 million.

Public Realm

  • City Staff are recommending the approval of a detailed investment plan for the urban park and public realm. It will ensure that the City can deliver on much of the feedback received from residents, working groups and staff (better sledding area, an area for small concerts, opportunity for better furnishings and design improvements for comfort and safety).
  • City staff are recommending a strategic investment for the urban park and public realm that will aim to create a more welcoming outdoor venue with the understood target being 5 million visitors to the site annually.

Heritage

  • The plan looks at upgrades to the Horticulture Building and Aberdeen pavilion and seeks to retain experts to introduce better climate control methods while maintaining heritage considerations.
  • These upgrades will support wider programming opportunities across the site throughout the year

Affordable Housing

  • The City is recommending that the new residential component will have a minimum of 10% affordable housing estimated at 120 units.
  • The disposal of the air rights will be conditioned to ensure that the affordable housing units remain affordable in perpetuity under the ownership and administration of a nonprofit housing provider.

Public Consultation

  • This report, which was approved, was asking Council to approve the business case, and to allow Staff to continue negotiations with OSEG to advance the design, cost estimates, consultation, and engagement as per the Council approved direction in July 2021.
  • With this report now approved by Council, Staff will begin the city-initiated rezoning included in the concept.

Property Tax Uplift

  • Additional property taxes for the estimated 1200 residential units and 59,000 sq/ft of retail space will be used.
  • 90% of this additional property tax will be dedicated to debt servicing, the remaining 10%, and all future tax increases after the stabilization date (2027-2029), will be used to fund city services.

Waterfall

  • In the current agreement, OSEG is paid back first, but in the proposed Lansdowne 2.0 we reprioritized the waterfall so the City does not have to wait until OSEG is repaid its equity.
  • In the Lansdowne 2.0 the City’s assets will be newer and require less lifecycle spending and the City is receiving more distributions because we start sharing in the profits right away.

Transportation

  • With the possibility of residential growth and more events to occur at Lansdowne Park, access to and from the site by all transportation modes has been considered at a high level. Specific direction from Council as part of the 2021 report asked that any changes made to Lansdowne must take into consideration all users of the site, with a focus on making pedestrians and cyclists feel safer.
  • Staff are proposing a medium to long-term plan for initiatives that will enhance connectivity for pedestrians and cyclists and improve on-site safety for all users and reduce conflict between transportation modes. Twenty-four suggested connectivity improvements, along with a key map, are listed in Document 3 (Lansdowne Park – Proposed Active Transportation Upgrades).

Accessibility

  • It is expected that an accessibility lens be applied to all design elements of new proposed features as part of the Lansdowne 2.0 project to ensure that requirements of the City of Ottawa Accessibility Design Standards (ADS) are met, which will include ensuring appropriate design team expertise, consultations with the community and consultation with the Accessibility Advisory Committee (AAC).

If you have any questions about this project please contact us at lansdownerenewal@ottawa.ca.

  • Council approves Lansdowne renewal plan

    Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin Email this link

    City Council approved the plan for Lansdowne 2.0 today. The plan will help reinvigorate one of the City’s most important assets through the construction of a new mid-size event centre, new north-side stadium stands, a two-storey retail space and two residential towers. At the same time, it provides needed funds for affordable housing in Ottawa.

    The existing arena and north-side stands are City-owned facilities that are functionally obsolete and will not be able to live up to their intended use in the future. Maintaining them would require costly, ongoing repairs to fix a growing number of deficiencies. By replacing them, the facilities will become accessible and the environmental impact of operating the building will be reduced. The arena is currently the least energy efficient City-owned facility. In addition, the City and its partner – the Ottawa Sports and Entertainment Group (OSEG) – will draw more major events to Ottawa, increasing potential City revenues and supporting Lansdowne businesses.

    The new event centre will accommodate nearly 4,700 general admission seats, and capacity increases to 5,500 for hockey games and 6,500 for concerts. The proposed north-side stands reduce current seating capacity from 14,000 to 11,000 but includes standing room for an additional 900. The approved plan contemplates two residential towers with maximum heights of 40 storeys. Limiting redevelopment to two towers will ensure the site can accommodate about 2,600 square metres of new public space adjacent to Aberdeen Pavilion. The two-storey retail building would include about 4,550 square metres of commercial space.

    The City’s total capital cost is estimated at about $419 million, but taxpayers will pay only about one third of that – around $146 million. The approved plan will deliver new City-owned facilities for a net cost of about $5 million a year after factoring in revenues from the sale of subterranean and air rights.

    Council carried several motions to further refine the Lansdowne plan, committing the City to:

    • Increase the portion of estimated subterranean and air rights value to be allocated to the City’s affordable Housing reserve by 15 per cent (about $5.9 million), in line with the City’s Affordable Housing Land and Funding Policy.
    • Direct 50 per cent of any revenues from the disposal of subterranean and air rights that are above the estimated value of $39 million to the affordable housing reserve.
    • Remove the 770-unit cap on the number of dwellings that could be developed within the two residential towers and eliminate the minimum parking rate to help address housing needs and provide the City with additional funds through property tax uplift.
    • Work with OSEG to develop a social procurement framework to help increase opportunities for traditionally underrepresented groups through the Lansdowne 2.0 project.
    • Extend the principles guiding traffic demand management for large events to other events held at Lansdowne.
    • Increase the community programming plan in the urban park at Lansdowne to better leverage City facilities on non-event days.
    • Advance options to increase and enhance public space at Lansdowne, including improving the interface between the event centre and the Great Lawn, improving access to washrooms and other amenities, and providing flexibility for community use.
    • Explore options to re-create a berm in proximity to the Great Lawn, preserving the public art piece, Moving Surfaces.
    • Assess the feasibility of possible new active transportation infrastructure, including a signalized crossing at Princess Patricia Way and Queen Elizabeth Drive (QED), pedestrian crossovers on both QED and Holmwood Avenue, protected cycling facilities on Fifth Avenue, a wider westbound bike lane at QED and extended sidewalks on Echo Drive.
    • Work with the National Capital Commission and Parks Canada to explore adding boat up access to Lansdowne and a pedestrian crossover on QED at Princess Patricia Way.
    • Work with OSEG to consider options for including a roof over the new north side stands.
    • Work with OSEG to explore future opportunities at Lansdowne for Ottawa-based independent concert promoters.
    • Prioritize a series of public realm improvements that would be funded from future City Budgets.
    • Explore making Aberdeen Square a more hospitable and pedestrian friendly area, possibly by closing or further reducing through traffic.
    • Consider providing electric charging stations and carshare facilities on City-controlled parking at Lansdowne, and including transportation demand management criteria in the request for offer for subterranean and air rights.
    • Study options to help reduce the potential financial risk to taxpayers stemming from this project.

    Today’s decision means City work to find an affordable option to secure a vibrant future for Lansdowne will continue. As the City and its partners move ahead with detailed design for the proposed redevelopment, there will be further opportunities for Council to consider before construction begins. That will include opportunities to consider a report on Lansdowne from the City’s Auditor General.

  • Committees refer new Lansdowne plan to Council for decision

    Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin Email this link

    At a joint meeting today, the Finance and Corporate Services Committee and the Planning and Housing Committee referred the plan for Lansdowne 2.0 to Council for consideration on Friday, November 10. This includes a revised concept plan and funding structure to build a new event centre, north side stands, a two-storey retail space and two residential towers.

    The Lansdowne plan, which originally included three residential towers, was revised to reflect feedback received from the public. The residential tower closest to Aberdeen Pavilion has been removed and the two remaining towers would be 40 and 25 storeys. Removing one tower also creates an opportunity to introduce about 27,900 square metres of new public realm space adjacent to Aberdeen Pavilion. The updated plan reduces proposed housing on the site from 1,200 to 770 dwellings, and parking from 739 to 336 spaces. It reduces the available commercial space to 49,000 square feet from an original plan for 108,000 square feet.

    The new event centre will accommodate nearly 4,700 general admission seats, more than 800 premium seats and standing room for 700. Seating capacity will be 5,500 for hockey games and 6,500 for concert events, with extra capacity available using retractable and flexible seating. The redesigned north side stands would see seating capacity reduced from 14,000 to 11,000, plus standing room for 900.

    Over the next 10 years, the City would request capital funding through the annual budget process to enhance the urban park at Lansdowne. There is currently 170,000 square feet of green space, including the berm and, when the event centre is built, that will be reduced to 118,000 square feet of open space. That will be augmented by the additional 27,900 square feet of new public realm space for a total of 145,900 square feet of green and public realm space.

    Staff recommend that 10 per cent of the property rights be allocated to affordable housing. The remaining 15 per cent, which would normally be deducted according to the City’s Integrated Transition to Housing Strategy, would be exempt. Allocating 10 per cent would provide the City an additional $3.9 million that can be used immediately towards the City’s affordable housing priority list.

    The total capital cost for the City is estimated at approximately $419 million. This estimate includes the cost of preliminary works, construction, costs related to design and delivery, escalation allowances and contingency costs. The City will invest $419.1 million in assets for a net debt servicing requirement of $5.0 million. This equates to $95.4 million in net present value terms. That means taxpayers would be getting a $419.1-million asset for a net cost of $95.4 million.

  • Project update: Lansdowne 2.0 Project

    Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin Email this link

    The City of Ottawa has received a proposal from the Ottawa Sports and Entertainment Group (OSEG) to strengthen the partnership and redevelop Lansdowne to make it financially stable for the long term and to rehabilitate public infrastructure.

    Proposal

    The proposal is to demolish the existing north stadium stands and arena complex, and build a new, world-class event centre and north stadium stands. This new public infrastructure will make the venues accessible and sustainable, better positioning Lansdowne as an iconic, landmark site. A new retail podium and additional residential units are also included within the proposal.

    Project Update

    Since the launch of the Lansdowne 2.0 Project, City Staff have worked to ensure a robust public engagement process has taken place. This has included a dedicated project website for residents to review information, a dedicated email address for residents to send in questions and concerns, four public information sessions, multiple surveys, weekly coffee chats, pop-up events, and weekly meetings with the Ward Councillor.

    The results of the City’s engagement can be found in the final As We Heard It report on the project website. The Lansdowne project team would like to thank everyone for taking the time to provide their feedback.

    Over the last 10 months, city staff has been working on the following:

    • The City launched it’s the planning process the required Zoning By-law Amendment and Official Plan Amendment
    • The City launched its Public Engagement Process noted above
    • The City initiated and completed its Request for Expression of Interest of the Property Rights (REOI)
    • The City hired a third-party financial consultant for financial analysis on the 2022 funding strategy, as well as cash flow and financing projections that Council approved and directed staff to investigate further.

    Key Public Input

    The key themes of public comments from the three public information sessions, email correspondence and coffee chat series include:

    Key Themes:

    • Density and Intensification –3 towers and potential 40 stories in height
    • Green Space - Loss of green space on Great Lawn, tree canopy
    • Transportation and Transit - Car traffic within Lansdowne, traffic on event nights, access to QED
    • Active Transportation - Cycling infrastructure, pedestrian safety
    • Public Realm & Urban Park - Lack of public washrooms, insufficient shade, public art
    • Financial Model - Transparency, financial risk
    • Retail and Entertainment - Lack of local vendors

    Key Changes

    As a result of public feedback, financial due diligence, expert 3rd party advice, and proper city planning, many significant features have changed since the original OSEG proposal was received by the City in May 2022.

    • 2 mixed-use towers – The original proposal included 3 high-rise towers. The staff report limits the potential to 2 towers only.
    • 40 and 25 stories – The original proposal included 3 towers that could be up to 40 stories. Staff recommend capping the max unit number which would result in only one tower potentially being 40 stories in height.
    • Max. 770 units - The original proposal included a unit count of 1200 units. Staff recommend capping the maximum amount of density at 770 units. This allows the flexibility of design but does not allow a second tower of 40 stories in height.
    • 336 residential parking spaces - The original proposal included 739 residential parking spaces – reduction of 403 spaces and now implies a parking ratio of 0.4 spaces per unit.
    • 35 parking spaces for Event Centre – The original proposal did not include any parking spaces for Event Centre. These new spaces will be dedicated to accessibility, and ease of access for events and minor sports at the Event Centre.
    • 27,900 s.f. new public realm - The original proposal did not include any include of public realm space. With the removal of the 3rd tower, this opens up 27,900 square feet of new public realm space.
    • 49,000 s.f. of retail - The original proposal included 108,000 square feet of retail space, this has been reduced to 49,000 square feet of retail space

    Cost of Doing Nothing

    The City has reviewed the cost of not proceeding with 2.0. It is important for residents also understand the current situation. Some of the key factors of not proceeding with making Lansdowne Park sustainable are as follows:

    • The current Civic Centre (arena) is functionally obsolete and will eventually need to be replaced.
    • The stadium (TD Place) and arena (Civic Centre) are City assets, and it is the City’s responsibility to replace them. They will need to be replaced eventually.
    • As they age, the cost to maintain will only increase.
    • The sports facilities are the most energy inefficient buildings the City owns – also increasing cost to operate.
    • The Partnership with Ottawa Sports and Entertainment Group (OSEG) is not financially sustainable – year over year deficits since 2014.
    • Cannot assume that OSEG will continue to fund these deficits.
    • Finding another investor/operator either from the private or non-profit sector will cost the City much more than today. We currently pay nothing into the Partnership’s closed financial system.
    • Could cost the City up to $400M or more to keep the old building and continue operations for the next 42 years.

    The business case for Lansdowne 2.0 is positive. The City will gain a $419 million dollar asset for $5 million annually in debt serving investment from the City. No other City asset has a stream of revenue similar to Lansdowne to help to fund it. Lansdowne Park has City owned assets that will need to be renewed eventually and the City gains, and retains ownership, of new assets – Event Centre and North Side Stands

    Committee and Council

    Following months of engagement and review, the City will be considering the Lansdowne Partnership Plan - Authorization to Proceed to the Next Steps in the Redevelopment Report and recommendations at:

    • November 2, 2023 - Joint Finance and Corporate Services and Planning and Housing Committee
    • November 6, 2023 - Built Heritage Committee
    • November 10, 2023 - City Council

    Next Steps

    Should City Council approve of this report and continue with the project, there will be many more opportunities to engage with staff and the City. Some of the next decision points that will come back to Council in the future include:

    • A report of the construction procurement model
    • Event Centre Site Plan
    • Issue the Request For Offers (RFO) for mixed-use towers
    • Construction Procurement tender price

    For more information please visit the project webpage here.

    If you have any questions, comments or concerns please send us an email at LansdowneRenewal@Ottawa.ca.

  • The Lansdowne 2.0 report

    Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin Email this link

    The Lansdowne 2.0 report is now live and available for review here.

  • Project update: Lansdowne 2.0 Project

    Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin Email this link

    The City of Ottawa has received a proposal from the Ottawa Sports and Entertainment Group (OSEG) to strengthen the partnership and redevelop Lansdowne to make it financially stable for the long term and to rehabilitate public infrastructure.

    Proposal

    The proposal is to demolish the existing north stadium stands and arena complex, and build a new, world-class event centre and north stadium stands. This new public infrastructure will make the venues accessible and sustainable, better positioning Lansdowne as an iconic, landmark site. A new retail podium and additional residential units are also included within the proposal. To learn more about the proposal, please visit the Lansdowne 2.0 Engage Ottawa page here.

    Project update

    The City initiated the planning process to support the Lansdowne 2.0 project on Thursday, June 29. This included the circulation of the Zoning By-law Amendment and Official Plan Amendment for public review and comment.

    As part of the application process, the proposed development was presented to the City’s Urban Design Review Panel (UDRP) on Friday, July 7. The presentation focused on four key development objectives: mix of uses, mobility, design and scale, and public realm. The Lansdowne Project team will return to the UDRP as the project advances for further input on the new event centre, north side stands, retail podium, residential towers and public realm.

    Accessibility Advisory Committee

    The Lansdowne 2.0 project was presented to the Accessibility Advisory Committee (AAC) on Tuesday, August 15 as a first step in consultation on the accessibility needs of the event centre, north side stands and overall site improvements.

    The City presented the AAC an evaluation of the existing conditions of the current TD Arena, north side stands and surrounding site, with deficiencies discussed such as:

    Existing north side stands

    · Lack of fair seating options for those with accessibility needs

    · Lack of ability to improve options for accessible seating in locations due to lack of elevator access to upper levels

    · Lack of easily and fully accessible washrooms and universal washrooms with adult change tables meeting today’s codes and accessibility standards, in order to meet the needs of the wider community

    · Failure of concession stands to meet accessibility standards

    Existing Event Centre

    · Lack of fair seating options for those with accessibility needs

    · Hazard to all posed by stadium support columns, including persons with vision disabilities

    · Lack of accessible gate entry options

    · Failure of concession stands to meet accessibility standards

    · Lack of easily and fully accessible washrooms and universal washrooms with adult change table meeting today’s codes and accessibility standards, in order to meet the needs of the wider community

    · Lack of options for locker rooms and referee facilities to accommodate Para sports, such as sledge hockey players/officials, wheelchair basketball, curler, etc.

    · Lack of accessible press facilities

    The project will continue to consult with the AAC through the design development of the event centre and north side stands, including through future Site Plan Control applications and tendering processes.

    Lansdowne 2.0 digital twin

    The digital twin is a virtual representation of the proposed development within the context of Lansdowne today. This 3D model is intended to provide a virtual representation of the site once fully built out. The digital twin will continue to be updated as the project evolves, and a final design will be posted online once approved.

    Public engagement update

    The City launched the first phase of public consultation beginning with a citywide survey on the overall Concept Plan. This survey received over 2,000 responses and has helped City staff gauge the general public knowledge and understanding of the overall proposal.

    The City launched a second survey on public realm and staff received more than 700 responses. The As We Heard It Report can be found here.

    The City has held three separate public information sessions, focusing on the overall Concept Plan, the Urban Park/Public Realm plan and the Planning Act applications. In total, more than 450 residents attended the sessions. Presentation materials, FAQs and As We Heard It Reports can also be found on Engage Ottawa.

    A second opportunity to hear the Planning Act applications presentation and ask questions will be held in a virtual meeting on Wednesday, September 6 at 6 pm. Those interested in attending can register here.

    The project team continues to hold the Lansdowne 2.0 Coffee Chat series. These are weekly gatherings where the public can ask questions, learn about the project, and share thoughts with the Director of the Lansdowne Project from the comfort of home or office. You can register for a coffee chat with the Director here.

    Residents can also look out for City staff on site where we will ask you to participate in a survey. The collection of this data is crucial to understanding the needs and wants surrounding Lansdowne.

    Key public input

    The key themes of public comments from the three public information sessions, email correspondence and coffee chat series include:

    1. Density
    2. Tower height
    3. Proximity of Tower 3 to Aberdeen Pavilion
    4. Closure of Aberdeen Square to traffic
    5. Public realm improvements
    6. Financial structure of the project

    Committee and Council

    The staff report and final recommendations are targeted to come before a joint meeting of the Finance and Corporate Services Committee and the Planning and Housing Committee on Wednesday, October 18, to Built Heritage Committee on Monday, October 23, and to City Council on Wednesday, October 25.

    If you have any questions, comments or concerns please send us an email at LansdowneRenewal@Ottawa.ca.

  • Lansdowne 2.0 Public Engagement Sessions

    Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin Email this link

    The City of Ottawa is getting ready to host a Lansdowne 2.0 virtual public engagement session on September 6th at 6:00 p.m. (register here).

    The session will provide an opportunity for residents to learn more about the City of Ottawa City initiated Official Plan Amendment and Zoning By-law Amendment. These are required to clarify policies within the Official Plan (OP) pertaining to the Lansdowne Special District and ensure OP compatibility and compliance.

    Staff will provide a presentation which will be followed by a question and answer period.

    Please send any questions in advance of the public information session to LansdowneRenewal@ottawa.ca

  • Lansdowne Park Project - 2.0 - Newsletter

    Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin Email this link

    The City of Ottawa has received a proposal from the Ottawa Sports and Entertainment Group (OSEG) to strengthen the partnership and redevelop the site to make it financially stable for the long term and address rehabilitation of the infrastructure.

    Proposal

    The proposal is to demolish the existing North Stadium Stands and arena complex, and build a new, world-class Event Centre and North Stadium Stands. This new public infrastructure will make the venues accessible, sustainable, and better position

    Lansdowne as an iconic, landmark site. New retail podium and additional residential units are also included within the proposal.

    Project update

    The Lansdowne 2.0 Project team has been preparing to bring forward a report to Finance and Corporate Services Committee on a revised Funding Strategy and Business Case for the Revitalization of Lansdowne 2.0. Three streams of work are being undertaken as part of this report to Committee and Council; Financial Due Diligence, City Initiated Planning Application, Request for Expression of Interest.

    Financial Due Diligence

    Staff are underway on the Financial Due Diligence review as part of the Lansdowne 2.0 project with the aid of Ernst and Young (3rd party consultant) retained by the City. The City and their consultant are exploring a variety of inputs on the Financial Model including but not limited to;

    • Cost to Construct
    • Retail Strategy
    • Podium Financing
    • Affordable Housing
    • Unit Typology
    • Financial Risk Analysis
    • Accessible Roof / Green Roof
    • Alternate Financing Options
    • North Side Stands Roof / Canopy
    • Proforma Projections
    • REOI Findings


    Planning Process update

    The City has hired its consulting team for the City initiated planning process to support the Lansdowne 2.0 project. The consulting team is currently underway with exploring the Lansdowne 2.0 proposal (new event centre, new north side stands, new retail podium, up to 1200 units of residential within high-rise towers of up to 40 storeys), and will deliver the following reports and studies as part of the City initiated planning application launching in June 2023:

    • Planning Rationale and Design Brief
    • Conceptual Site Plan and Massing Analysis & Alternatives
    • Shadow Study
    • Wind Study
    • Transportation Impact Assessment
    • Heritage Impact Assessment
    • Functional Servicing Report
    • Geotechnical and Hydrogeological Report


    Request for Expression of Interest update

    The City launched its Request for Expression of Interest process by posting the Lansdowne Park Revitalization Air Rights Development Opportunity on MERX April 14th, 2023 (MERX is Canada’s leading electronic tendering service, with the most complete source of public and private sector contract opportunities available in Canada). The REOI document is used to gather useful information from potential respondents and will test and refine the Lansdowne 2.0 project vision prior to the more formal Request for Proposal (RFP) process. The deadline for the solicitation of the REOI closes on June 9th, 2023, and City Staff will summarize the findings within the revised Funding Strategy and Business Case report to Finance and Corporate Services Committee.

    Public Engagement update

    The City launched the first phase of public consultation beginning with a city-wide survey on the overall Concept Plan. This survey has received nearly 2000 responses and has helped city staff understand the general publics knowledge and understanding of the overall Proposal.

    The City has held two separate public information sessions, focusing on the overall Concept Plan on April 27th and the Urban Park/Public Realm plan on May 17th. Both sessions had over 150 residents attend. Presentation materials, FAQ’s, and As We Heard It Reports can also be found on Engage Ottawa. The May 17th Public Information Session As We Heard It Report will be released in the coming weeks.

    Ongoing public consultation, education, and awareness will feature on-site engagement, public information sessions and workshops.

    In the coming weeks, we will be launching the Lansdowne 2.0 Coffee Chat series, a weekly gathering where staff or the public can ask questions, learn about the project, and share your thoughts directly with the Director of the Lansdowne 2.0 Project from the comfort of your home or office.

    The coffee chats will be held every Wednesday starting on June 14 from 12:00 PM to 1:00 PM on Zoom. You can register for a coffee chat with the Director here.

    Urban Park and Public Realm Update

    As part of the Lansdowne Partnership Sustainability Plan and Implementation Report July 2022 report, Council approved the next steps in the redevelopment of the Urban

    Park/Public Realm to create a strategic public investment plan of capital improvements to enhance site animation, programming, and public access.

    On Wednesday May 17, 2023, the City hosted a public engagement session on the Lansdowne Public Realm/Urban Park and engaged with residents to prioritize the 25 ideas that have been captured from various consultation efforts and were included in the July 2022 report as Document 2 - Strategic Investment Plan for the Urban Park and Public Realm. Staff also received many new ideas that will be reviewed for consideration.

    The survey is live on Engage Ottawa, and you can access it here.

    For engagement opportunities, project material and updates, visit Engage Ottawa.

    Any questions, comments, or concerns can be sent to LansdowneRenewal@Ottawa.ca.

    We thank you for your continued input and engagement and we look forward to shaping the future of Lansdowne Park together!

  • Launch of the Public Realm/Urban Park Survey

    Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin Email this link

    As part of the Lansdowne 2.0 project and as a follow up to the many ideas that have been brought forward and gleaned from the public through previous engagements, the City would like to hear from you on the prioritization of the list of ideas. The intent is to improve the site by making the urban park more welcoming and support increased use of the park for an enhanced public experience.

    On May 17, 2023, we hosted a public engagement session on the Lansdowne Public Realm/Urban Park and presented 25 ideas that have been captured from various engagement efforts. You can view the 25 ideas that were proposed here.

    This survey is to review the list of ideas and give you an opportunity to prioritize them and let us know if we have missed some ideas.

    The survey is now available here.

  • April 27th public session and Concept Plan Survey "As We Heard It"

    Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin Email this link

    The release of the "As We Heard It" report for the April 27th public session is now available here.

    Over 150 residents attended the session that consisted of a presentation on the overall Concept Plan, the Air Rights and Request for Expression of Interest (REOI), the business model with the financial strategy, and a Question and Answer period. The presentation is also available here.

    Thank you to the participants whom attended and provided their feedback.

    In the "April 27 - As We Heard It " report, There are a few outstanding questions we are working on and will follow up in the coming weeks.

    The release of the "Concept Plan Survey - As We Heard It" report is also now available here. Over 1800 responses to the survey were received.

    Thank you everyone who completed the survey.

    Please stay turned on Engage Ottawa for information and updates.

  • Engagement session on the Lansdowne 2.0 Public Realm/Urban Park

    Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin Email this link

    Thank you everyone for attending our virtual public information session on Thursday April 27th.

    The PowerPoint that was presented can be found here and we will be releasing an As We Heard It Report in the coming weeks summarizing the discussion and feedback that we received.

    As part of the Lansdowne 2.0 project and as a follow up to the many ideas that have come forward through various public consultations held for the Aberdeen Square and the Urban Park, the City would like to hear from you on the prioritization of the list of ideas that have been brought forward and gleaned from the public through previous engagements. The intent to improve the site by making the urban park more welcoming and support increased use of the park for an enhanced public experience.

    Please join us on May 17th at 6pm for a virtual engagement session on the Lansdowne 2.0 Public Realm/Urban Park. You can register by following this link. Please send any questions in advance of the engagement session to LansdowneRenewal@Ottawa.ca.

    Please stay tuned and subscribe here for more news and project updates. We look forward to your continued participation in the Lansdowne 2.0 project.

    The Lansdowne Project Team

Page last updated: 10 Nov 2023, 10:28 AM