The Ottawa Hospital Master Plan

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The Ottawa Hospital’s new Civic campus development, which will be located on Carling Avenue adjacent to Dow’s Lake, will be the major referral centre for Eastern Ontario, Western Quebec and parts of Nunavut, and the Eastern Ontario Trauma Centre. As one of Canada’s largest acute care learning and research hospitals, the new campus will provide a full range of specialized services, research and education for those with the most complex injuries and illness.

Background of the hospital project

  • 2007 - the Ottawa Hospital convened a Steering Committee to develop a Master Plan which concluded the current Civic Campus is too old and would be too difficult and costly to rebuild.
  • 2009 to 2013 - the Ottawa Hospital (TOH) was in discussions with the Government of Canada related to master planning for a new Ottawa Hospital campus and land requirements.
  • 2014 - the Government of Canada commissioned the National Capital Commission to assist in the land transfer process to TOH.
  • December 2015 - the federal government requested a further review of the land options for the new campus and four sites were examined
  • May 2016 to November 2016 – NCC Public Consultation and Site Selection
  • December 2016 - Canadian Heritage requested that the Federal government make the Sir John Carling site available as the future location of the new campus of TOH.
  • May 2017 - the City’s Planning Committee recommended that staff initiate Official Plan and Zoning By-law amendment applications for this federal land use decision.
  • September 2017 to January 2018 – public engagement strategy with nine open houses
  • December 2017 and March 2018 – design sessions with the Urban Design Review Panel
  • February 2018 - PSPC announced a 99-year lease between the Federal Government and TOH for the development of a new campus.
  • May to June 2018 – Official Plan and Zoning By-law amendments approved by Planning Committee and City Council through By-law 2018-198 to a new Institutional I2 Zone

A holding provision, (D07-12-21-20-TOH) was established to ensure a master plan, transportation study, cultural heritage study and master servicing study will be approved by Planning Committee and Council. The holding provision can be lifted once Planning Committee and Council approve the subject Master Plan and its related supporting studies.

Proposal

The proposed Hospital Site is located at 930 Carling Avenue and 520 Preston Street that is approximately 21 hectares in size within Wards 16 and 17 and adjacent to Wards 14 and 15 (see Figure 1).

The site is irregularly shaped and bound by Carling Avenue to the north, Prince of Wales Drive and Preston Street to the east and is loosely bound by the National Capital Commission Scenic Driveway to the south and Maple Drive to the east. The Trillium line (O-Train line) bisects the eastern part of the site.

The primary access for staff and visitors is off both Carling Avenue (across from Champagne Ave) and Prince of Wales Drive, accessing the new 4 storey parking structure.

New Civic Project

Master Plan

Once the Master Plan is approved, individual site plan control applications will be submitted for City review and approval based on the proposed phasing of the hospital master plan.

Due to the size of the project, the new Ottawa Hospital will be completed in phases. The Master Plan currently outlines 10 phases, where the first three phases will prepare the site for the Hospital’s construction set to begin in Phase 4 (2024-2028).

2021: Widen the O-Train trench, enabling the construction of a parking garage

2022: Start of on-site parking garage to be completed end of 2023; select the preferred proponents and long-term partners for the new Civic development

2023: Establish the services and utilities to the Site

2024: Construction begins for four years

2025 to 2027: The transit connection to TOH Campus will be improved with the opening of Dow’s Lake Light Rail Transit (LRT) Station.

2027: Transition management to the new site

2028: Grand opening

2030 to 2048: Future expansions

Timelines and Approval Authority

The target date for the application to be considered by the City’s Planning Committee, is September 09, 2021

Public information session

The City of Ottawa hosted a public meeting to discuss the new Ottawa Hospital Master Plan on June 29th, 2021 at 6 pm on Zoom.

Presentation

Stay Informed and Involved

  1. Register for future notifications about this site plan control application by providing your comments by e-mailing Sean Moore and adding File No. D07-12-21-20-TOH in the subject line.
  2. Access submitted plans and studies regarding this application online at ottawa.ca/devapps.

Concept photo of the North East side of the Hospital
Concept photo of the South East side of the Hospital

The Ottawa Hospital’s new Civic campus development, which will be located on Carling Avenue adjacent to Dow’s Lake, will be the major referral centre for Eastern Ontario, Western Quebec and parts of Nunavut, and the Eastern Ontario Trauma Centre. As one of Canada’s largest acute care learning and research hospitals, the new campus will provide a full range of specialized services, research and education for those with the most complex injuries and illness.

Background of the hospital project

  • 2007 - the Ottawa Hospital convened a Steering Committee to develop a Master Plan which concluded the current Civic Campus is too old and would be too difficult and costly to rebuild.
  • 2009 to 2013 - the Ottawa Hospital (TOH) was in discussions with the Government of Canada related to master planning for a new Ottawa Hospital campus and land requirements.
  • 2014 - the Government of Canada commissioned the National Capital Commission to assist in the land transfer process to TOH.
  • December 2015 - the federal government requested a further review of the land options for the new campus and four sites were examined
  • May 2016 to November 2016 – NCC Public Consultation and Site Selection
  • December 2016 - Canadian Heritage requested that the Federal government make the Sir John Carling site available as the future location of the new campus of TOH.
  • May 2017 - the City’s Planning Committee recommended that staff initiate Official Plan and Zoning By-law amendment applications for this federal land use decision.
  • September 2017 to January 2018 – public engagement strategy with nine open houses
  • December 2017 and March 2018 – design sessions with the Urban Design Review Panel
  • February 2018 - PSPC announced a 99-year lease between the Federal Government and TOH for the development of a new campus.
  • May to June 2018 – Official Plan and Zoning By-law amendments approved by Planning Committee and City Council through By-law 2018-198 to a new Institutional I2 Zone

A holding provision, (D07-12-21-20-TOH) was established to ensure a master plan, transportation study, cultural heritage study and master servicing study will be approved by Planning Committee and Council. The holding provision can be lifted once Planning Committee and Council approve the subject Master Plan and its related supporting studies.

Proposal

The proposed Hospital Site is located at 930 Carling Avenue and 520 Preston Street that is approximately 21 hectares in size within Wards 16 and 17 and adjacent to Wards 14 and 15 (see Figure 1).

The site is irregularly shaped and bound by Carling Avenue to the north, Prince of Wales Drive and Preston Street to the east and is loosely bound by the National Capital Commission Scenic Driveway to the south and Maple Drive to the east. The Trillium line (O-Train line) bisects the eastern part of the site.

The primary access for staff and visitors is off both Carling Avenue (across from Champagne Ave) and Prince of Wales Drive, accessing the new 4 storey parking structure.

New Civic Project

Master Plan

Once the Master Plan is approved, individual site plan control applications will be submitted for City review and approval based on the proposed phasing of the hospital master plan.

Due to the size of the project, the new Ottawa Hospital will be completed in phases. The Master Plan currently outlines 10 phases, where the first three phases will prepare the site for the Hospital’s construction set to begin in Phase 4 (2024-2028).

2021: Widen the O-Train trench, enabling the construction of a parking garage

2022: Start of on-site parking garage to be completed end of 2023; select the preferred proponents and long-term partners for the new Civic development

2023: Establish the services and utilities to the Site

2024: Construction begins for four years

2025 to 2027: The transit connection to TOH Campus will be improved with the opening of Dow’s Lake Light Rail Transit (LRT) Station.

2027: Transition management to the new site

2028: Grand opening

2030 to 2048: Future expansions

Timelines and Approval Authority

The target date for the application to be considered by the City’s Planning Committee, is September 09, 2021

Public information session

The City of Ottawa hosted a public meeting to discuss the new Ottawa Hospital Master Plan on June 29th, 2021 at 6 pm on Zoom.

Presentation

Stay Informed and Involved

  1. Register for future notifications about this site plan control application by providing your comments by e-mailing Sean Moore and adding File No. D07-12-21-20-TOH in the subject line.
  2. Access submitted plans and studies regarding this application online at ottawa.ca/devapps.

Concept photo of the North East side of the Hospital
Concept photo of the South East side of the Hospital

Public information session questions

Have a question about the Ottawa Hospital Master Plan? Leave your question below.

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Destroying the green space would be a tragedy.

David Dunkelman 1 day ago

Based on the magnitude of this project I’m assuming there will be a follow-up public consultation to the one held in June. Can you please confirm the timing for that event. Is there a record of the concerns that were brought forward along with how they are being considered and addressed?

Christoph von Teichman 5 days ago

With so many brownfield sites available and in light of many government and businesses opening up usable space due to a shift in work-from-home accommodations this location seems the wrong choice. Protect green space, reduce heat island effects and follow your own site analysis data posted here:
https://ehq-production-canada.s3.ca-central-1.amazonaws.com/fde2c5fb28901f9ae1dfb0fcad0b20ecab76b94c/original/1622053525/b9164f421de511387c9db76a9061b63e_toh_site_analysis_en.pdf?X-Amz-Algorithm=AWS4-HMAC-SHA256&X-Amz-Credential=AKIAIBJCUKKD4ZO4WUUA%2F20210910%2Fca-central-1%2Fs3%2Faws4_request&X-Amz-Date=20210910T083321Z&X-Amz-Expires=300&X-Amz-SignedHeaders=host&X-Amz-Signature=231528130d87ef54f7aa53bcf94d175298c64307770e7c05f9571c3fef92e0b6

The negatives highly outweigh the benefits, oh except cost! It’s always cheaper to dig up some trees and fields vs doing the work. I truly hope the municipal and provincial governments will listen to its residents and go back to the original plan of tunneys pasture.

rich 11 days ago

Given that the location for this development has already been set adjacent to Dow’s Lake, a popular recreation destination for Ottawa residents and tourists, the Central Experimental Farm, the Arboretum, as well as the Rideau Canal UNESCO world heritage site, the developers of the site have a huge responsibility to uphold the character of the area, enhance the public realm, and to maintain connectivity for active transportation already existing on site. From what I can see, the cycling and walking connections are interrupted and this will create obstacles for public acceptance. The 2500 spot parkade is in a prime location, at the start of a scenic drive, not exactly a gateway structure to set the tone for a drive through the farm. It’s difficult to imagine the structure and see how integrated it will be with the landscape and how an elevated park will be used and maintained year-round. Will there be outdoor spaces for patients and visitors to the facility to help in their recovery? This would be one of the advantages for siting the facility in such a beautiful location.

DH B 14 days ago

I am definitely in agreement with most of the people/writers that the above ground parking building is not acceptable. I really do NOT agree with the present location of the new Civic, having always thought it should be located in Tunney's where there is a great deal more room to expand should more area be required as time goes by. The Experimental Farm is a special spot and one that is unique to Canada. It should be preserved at all costs. Traffic is already at a premium in the residential area around the proposed site and will only be worse as more and more high-rises are built, as they are presently proposed. Sherwood Drive used to be a quiet residential street and is rapidly becoming a speedway for autos in transition to get either to the Queensway or to Carling or Sommerset via side streets off Sherwood. There has to be a better solution!

jens 15 days ago

Given very extensive and legitimate concerns about the suitability of the current site, and the profound and long-lasting consequences of this decision, is there any unequivocal reason not to reconsider the Tunney's Pasture location? Who has responsibility and authority to put the current plans on hold and initiate such a review?

Rebecca, OOE 19 days ago

The EIS conducted does not fully count all of the trees that might be lost should the hospital construction be allowed to proceed. Will the City conduct a full audit and recount of trees by an independent third party?

Diane McIntyre 21 days ago

Have full geological studies been done of both the Tunney's Pasture and the experimental farm sites considered for the hospital relocation? I understand that the Central Experimental Farm has experienced tremors and is situated on a seismic fault.

Diane McIntyre 21 days ago

I am amazing with the space the new hospital takes; this is a luxury in an established city and seems unnecessary. The Civic is already difficult to access - narrow busy road off the highway, limited transit options, etc. Why is it being moved a few kms down the road to an even worse spot to access?
I am also curious about emergency management planning. Most the city's hospitals are located downtown and could be inaccessible during a major event (think the shooting near the parliament buildings several years ago, that shut down access to the hospitals), a tornado that knocks out the area, etc. Has emergency management been accessed or urban sprawl been considered? Has traffic flow patterns been examined (including transit)? Has the effect of loosing green space and climate change been studied? Has the effect on the Central Experimental Farm's ability to do research been studied? It feels like a much more robust location study needs to take place before building the hospital. I am all for a world class hospital, but its location and sprawl needs to be considered.

Aggie 24 days ago

It is nothing short of a travesty to select the Central Experimental Farm for the location of the new Civic Campus hospital. The Farm has been a gem for Ottawa, a testament to green space and research, and a wonderful zone for walking and biking within the nation's capital. Plunking a huge hospital in this area is completely absurd, particularly given the increased attention the climate and environment are now finally receiving.
But apart from the destruction of green space is access. As a frequent patient I am frustrated by the need to drive or be driven as the hospital is not on the new transitway. Parking is often full, and when a space can be found, is expensive. While hospitals may benefit, indeed depend on these revenues, I am a patient that would use the new O-Train to reach a hospital and not need a car.
Why has the site been chosen that continues to make access to those without a car, or the means to park a car, difficult. Why was the Tunney's Pasture site, already denuded of trees and an open palate for a hospital AND on the new transitway, taken off the list.
This makes absolutely no sense. It's not too late to make a better decision.
To continue with the plan on the Experimental Farm is simply irresponsible for the environment, the citizens of Ottawa, and in particular, patients.

Thinkagain about 1 month ago

The plan seems to be 180d off - the parking needs to be into the hillside, and hidden. The hospital needs to be integrated with the LRT. Riverside campus works well with the transit way, but would excel with an LRT that includes further accessibility components.

If there is no integration of LRT and hospital, and the parking is what is at that corner, than it needs to be underground period. There needs to be accessible paths (inside, either above or at or below grade) from LRT to hospital with moving sidewalks. I don't mind walking, but this is a hospital.

Gwen about 1 month ago

Will the Trillium pathway access to Dow's Lake be adversely affected?

aaronkmcbride about 1 month ago

Has an environmental assessment of the site been completed? In this time of severe climate change it seems like an essential consideration.

Jo Wood about 2 months ago

I think the original recommendation for the Tunney's location made more sense than the proposed Carling location. It would appear that the Carling location was chosen to indulge the idea of a convenient move by the hospital staff. Tunney's with its existing transit infrastructure would facilitate the transit users and adequate parking can be provided for those who drive. I discourage the sprawl in the building layout in the pictures. Why the sprawl? You expect sick patients to walk extended distances between buildings? Build them closer together and surround them with green space but keep point-to-point distances within the buildings short. I personally do not like the idea of what I see as unneccesary destruction of green space.

ottbuddy about 2 months ago

First off, the idea of placing Ottawa’s major hospital on a hilly site serviced by Carling and Prince of Wales Drive is totally absurd. The sight across from the current hospital is flat and would allow the heart institute to remain in its current location. Charitable contributors won’t be too pleased when they find the heart institute eventually moved to,the new hospital. Prince of Wales is already overloaded. Disaster if the hospital is built in the proposed location. And perhaps Tunneys is even better than across from the current hospital.
I understand that the traffic plan anticipates traffic will be reduced significantly because of the LRT. What is the traffic reduction estimate and the basis for this estimate?
Most patients coming to a hospital ar usually driven there. This will not change
Most professional staff work varied hours and will drive. If you think otherwise show me the evidence.
Visitors as they will be coming from all over the region will mostly drive. Some will use alternative means. What is the current status and what is the alternative you will be planning for?

Xbones about 2 months ago

The Queen Juliana Park immediately across Carling from Champagne Avenue is the only stretch of green space easily accessible to this neighbourhood on foot. It offers intuitive and easy access to the Arboretum and includes a large grassy field, big enough to receive the most liberal designation for dog walking in City parks (short of an enclosed, fully fenced dog-park) i.e.that dogs may be off-leash provided that they are under their owner's control. It is well used by neighbourhood dog owners and the number of dogs has increased since the pandemic even faster than the rate of densification. There is no parking at other larger parks further west such as Fairmont Park (where dogs are not permitted off leash) or Reid Park both of which are a short drive away, should one have a car and care to pack the pooch up for a ride before the daily romp.In the winter, children sled in the park and families cross-country ski on their way to the Arboretum for some easily accessible cross-country ski
What plans are there to provide an easily accessible substitute facility in the immediate vicinity to fulfill these essential functions for urban parents, families and pet owners?

Lesley C 2 months ago

Room to grow?
One need only look at the long history of our current Civic Hospital to appreciate just how much such a world-class hospital facility grows over time. To where, exactly, will the new Ottawa Hospital expand in the future? By further incursion into the Central Experimental Farm? A move across Prince of Wales Drive into the Dominion Arboretum? Or across Preston Street into Commissioners’ Park? Maybe a new Dows Lake Pavilion? The fact is there is no room to grow in the proposed location without the loss of more accessible green space, historic sites and/or tourist attractions . What are the plans in that regard?

Lesley C 2 months ago

This comment says it all so I'm pasting it in again.

How does the mulching of 680 trees, many of which are 50 plus years old, on the proposed site align with the City's Climate Action plan? When you take the loss of these trees along with the 4 acres of Red Pine at Hunt Club that the city plans to turn into a parking lot and the loss of the woods at the new Embassy Row, the combined loss is unfathomable. We need strong action to save what little greenery Ottawa has left after suffering huge canopy loss as a result of Ash Borer. As the temperatures globally go up, our natural environment is even more needed to combat heat waves, flooding and overall biodiversity loss. It's time for strong leadership!

dmp123 20 days ago

Gillian C 2 months ago

The hospital should be located at the Carling location an area zoned as institutional not park.

P.S Tunneys, is not the original location, that was across the street from the current site, and that would be my second choice.

Christopher Tupper 2 months ago

Is the city concerned about mixing tourist/neighbourhood pedestrian/cyclist traffic - those who are visiting our National Historic Buildings - with emergency vehicles on Maple Drive. Does the city think having emergency vehicles and the Central Utility Plant on Maple Drive will negatively impact the experience of visitors to our National Historic site?

L. Foley 2 months ago
Page last updated: 20 September 2021, 09:17