The Ottawa Hospital Master Plan

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The Ottawa Hospital’s new Civic campus development, which will be located on Carling Avenue adjacent to Dow’s Lake, will be the major referral centre for Eastern Ontario, Western Quebec and parts of Nunavut, and the Eastern Ontario Trauma Centre. As one of Canada’s largest acute care learning and research hospitals, the new campus will provide a full range of specialized services, research and education for those with the most complex injuries and illness.

Background of the hospital project

  • 2007 - the Ottawa Hospital convened a Steering Committee to develop a Master Plan which concluded the current Civic Campus is too old and would be too difficult and costly to rebuild.
  • 2009 to 2013 - the Ottawa Hospital (TOH) was in discussions with the Government of Canada related to master planning for a new Ottawa Hospital campus and land requirements.
  • 2014 - the Government of Canada commissioned the National Capital Commission to assist in the land transfer process to TOH.
  • December 2015 - the federal government requested a further review of the land options for the new campus and four sites were examined
  • May 2016 to November 2016 – NCC Public Consultation and Site Selection
  • December 2016 - Canadian Heritage requested that the Federal government make the Sir John Carling site available as the future location of the new campus of TOH.
  • May 2017 - the City’s Planning Committee recommended that staff initiate Official Plan and Zoning By-law amendment applications for this federal land use decision.
  • September 2017 to January 2018 – public engagement strategy with nine open houses
  • December 2017 and March 2018 – design sessions with the Urban Design Review Panel
  • February 2018 - PSPC announced a 99-year lease between the Federal Government and TOH for the development of a new campus.
  • May to June 2018 – Official Plan and Zoning By-law amendments approved by Planning Committee and City Council through By-law 2018-198 to a new Institutional I2 Zone

Proposal Master Site Plan

The proposed Hospital Site is located at 930 and 850 Carling Avenue and 520 Preston Street. The site is approximately 21 hectares in size within Wards 16 and 17 and adjacent to Wards 14 and 15 (see Figure 1).

The site is irregularly shaped and bound by Carling Avenue to the north, Prince of Wales Drive and Preston Street to the east and is loosely bound by the National Capital Commission Scenic Driveway to the south and Maple Drive to the east. The Trillium line (O-Train line) bisects the eastern part of the site.

The primary access for staff and visitors is off both Carling Avenue (across from Champagne Ave) and Prince of Wales Drive, accessing the new 4 storey parking structure.

The main hospital, which is located on the top of the escarpment, will be constructed after the parking structure and once services and utilities are established. The New Hospital Building includes a Central Podium, which will be three storeys, supporting the 2.5 million square feet of hospital space. The Central Podium has two entrance points. Visitors and patients will primarily access the hospital from the parking garage, rapid transit along Carling Avenue and the Carling LRT Station, with access via a pedestrian bridge from the parking facility to the main hospital building. A covered Emergency Department ambulatory drop-off will also be available on the east side of the building for visitor and patient access. First responders and ambulance transfer services, including the ambulance garage, will access the hospital from auxiliary entrances facing west.

Two patient care towers will flank the Central Podium, with the South Tower intended to be 12 storeys and will include a Helipad on the 12th floor, and the North Tower intended to be seven storeys. The proposed seven-storey North Tower is anticipated to be expanded vertically in future phases. The Main Plaza will connect the Central Podium to the entrance from Champage Avenue and Carling Avenue, providing vehicular, pedestrian and transit-user access to the Main Entrance.

New Civic Project

Due to the size of the project, the new Ottawa Hospital will be completed in phases. The Master Plan currently outlines 10 phases, where the first three phases will prepare the site for the Hospital’s construction set to begin in Phase 4 (2024-2028).

2021: Widen the O-Train trench, enabling the construction of a parking garage

2022: Start of on-site parking garage to be completed end of 2023; select the preferred proponents and long-term partners for the new Civic development

2023: Establish the services and utilities to the Site

2024: Construction begins for four years

2025 to 2027: The transit connection to TOH Campus will be improved with the opening of Dow’s Lake Light Rail Transit (LRT) Station.

2027: Transition management to the new site

2028: Grand opening

2030 to 2048: Future expansions

Master Site Plan Timeline

  • May 21, 2021 — The Master Site Plan went to NCC’s Advisory Committee on Planning, Design and Realty
  • June 4, 2021—Went to the City’s Urban Design Review Panel for recommendations
  • June 29, 2021—Public Consultation Meeting via Zoom
  • October 1, 2021— Joint meeting of the Built Heritage Sub-committee and the Planning Committee recommended approval of the Master Site Plan application
  • October 5, 2021—NCC’s Board of Directors approved the Master Site Plan
  • October 13, 2021—City Council voted to approve the Master Site Plan and lift the holding provision.

Phase 1 Site Plan Control Application

The site plan control application for a 4-storey parking structure to serve the New Ottawa Hospital has been submitted. The structure will accommodate approximately 2,400 parking spaces and 350 bicycle parking and storage spaces. The parking garage will include a publicly accessible green roof and programable open space, which will include a pedestrian connection from the main hospital building to the City’s LRT station on the north side of Carling Avenue.

Timelines

The target date for the application to be considered by the City’s Planning Committee, is Q1 2022. Other important dates include:

  • November 5, 2021 Urban Design Review Panel;
  • November 24, 2021 Public Information Meeting
  • November 26, 2021 NCC Advisory Committee on Planning, Design and Realty
  • Q1 2022 Planning Committee

Stay Informed and Involved

  1. Register for future notifications about this site plan control application by providing your comments by e-mailing Sean Moore and adding File No. D07-12-21-20-TOH in the subject line.
  2. Access submitted plans and studies regarding this application online at ottawa.ca/devapps.

Concept photo of the North East side of the Hospital
Concept photo of the South East side of the Hospital

The Ottawa Hospital’s new Civic campus development, which will be located on Carling Avenue adjacent to Dow’s Lake, will be the major referral centre for Eastern Ontario, Western Quebec and parts of Nunavut, and the Eastern Ontario Trauma Centre. As one of Canada’s largest acute care learning and research hospitals, the new campus will provide a full range of specialized services, research and education for those with the most complex injuries and illness.

Background of the hospital project

  • 2007 - the Ottawa Hospital convened a Steering Committee to develop a Master Plan which concluded the current Civic Campus is too old and would be too difficult and costly to rebuild.
  • 2009 to 2013 - the Ottawa Hospital (TOH) was in discussions with the Government of Canada related to master planning for a new Ottawa Hospital campus and land requirements.
  • 2014 - the Government of Canada commissioned the National Capital Commission to assist in the land transfer process to TOH.
  • December 2015 - the federal government requested a further review of the land options for the new campus and four sites were examined
  • May 2016 to November 2016 – NCC Public Consultation and Site Selection
  • December 2016 - Canadian Heritage requested that the Federal government make the Sir John Carling site available as the future location of the new campus of TOH.
  • May 2017 - the City’s Planning Committee recommended that staff initiate Official Plan and Zoning By-law amendment applications for this federal land use decision.
  • September 2017 to January 2018 – public engagement strategy with nine open houses
  • December 2017 and March 2018 – design sessions with the Urban Design Review Panel
  • February 2018 - PSPC announced a 99-year lease between the Federal Government and TOH for the development of a new campus.
  • May to June 2018 – Official Plan and Zoning By-law amendments approved by Planning Committee and City Council through By-law 2018-198 to a new Institutional I2 Zone

Proposal Master Site Plan

The proposed Hospital Site is located at 930 and 850 Carling Avenue and 520 Preston Street. The site is approximately 21 hectares in size within Wards 16 and 17 and adjacent to Wards 14 and 15 (see Figure 1).

The site is irregularly shaped and bound by Carling Avenue to the north, Prince of Wales Drive and Preston Street to the east and is loosely bound by the National Capital Commission Scenic Driveway to the south and Maple Drive to the east. The Trillium line (O-Train line) bisects the eastern part of the site.

The primary access for staff and visitors is off both Carling Avenue (across from Champagne Ave) and Prince of Wales Drive, accessing the new 4 storey parking structure.

The main hospital, which is located on the top of the escarpment, will be constructed after the parking structure and once services and utilities are established. The New Hospital Building includes a Central Podium, which will be three storeys, supporting the 2.5 million square feet of hospital space. The Central Podium has two entrance points. Visitors and patients will primarily access the hospital from the parking garage, rapid transit along Carling Avenue and the Carling LRT Station, with access via a pedestrian bridge from the parking facility to the main hospital building. A covered Emergency Department ambulatory drop-off will also be available on the east side of the building for visitor and patient access. First responders and ambulance transfer services, including the ambulance garage, will access the hospital from auxiliary entrances facing west.

Two patient care towers will flank the Central Podium, with the South Tower intended to be 12 storeys and will include a Helipad on the 12th floor, and the North Tower intended to be seven storeys. The proposed seven-storey North Tower is anticipated to be expanded vertically in future phases. The Main Plaza will connect the Central Podium to the entrance from Champage Avenue and Carling Avenue, providing vehicular, pedestrian and transit-user access to the Main Entrance.

New Civic Project

Due to the size of the project, the new Ottawa Hospital will be completed in phases. The Master Plan currently outlines 10 phases, where the first three phases will prepare the site for the Hospital’s construction set to begin in Phase 4 (2024-2028).

2021: Widen the O-Train trench, enabling the construction of a parking garage

2022: Start of on-site parking garage to be completed end of 2023; select the preferred proponents and long-term partners for the new Civic development

2023: Establish the services and utilities to the Site

2024: Construction begins for four years

2025 to 2027: The transit connection to TOH Campus will be improved with the opening of Dow’s Lake Light Rail Transit (LRT) Station.

2027: Transition management to the new site

2028: Grand opening

2030 to 2048: Future expansions

Master Site Plan Timeline

  • May 21, 2021 — The Master Site Plan went to NCC’s Advisory Committee on Planning, Design and Realty
  • June 4, 2021—Went to the City’s Urban Design Review Panel for recommendations
  • June 29, 2021—Public Consultation Meeting via Zoom
  • October 1, 2021— Joint meeting of the Built Heritage Sub-committee and the Planning Committee recommended approval of the Master Site Plan application
  • October 5, 2021—NCC’s Board of Directors approved the Master Site Plan
  • October 13, 2021—City Council voted to approve the Master Site Plan and lift the holding provision.

Phase 1 Site Plan Control Application

The site plan control application for a 4-storey parking structure to serve the New Ottawa Hospital has been submitted. The structure will accommodate approximately 2,400 parking spaces and 350 bicycle parking and storage spaces. The parking garage will include a publicly accessible green roof and programable open space, which will include a pedestrian connection from the main hospital building to the City’s LRT station on the north side of Carling Avenue.

Timelines

The target date for the application to be considered by the City’s Planning Committee, is Q1 2022. Other important dates include:

  • November 5, 2021 Urban Design Review Panel;
  • November 24, 2021 Public Information Meeting
  • November 26, 2021 NCC Advisory Committee on Planning, Design and Realty
  • Q1 2022 Planning Committee

Stay Informed and Involved

  1. Register for future notifications about this site plan control application by providing your comments by e-mailing Sean Moore and adding File No. D07-12-21-20-TOH in the subject line.
  2. Access submitted plans and studies regarding this application online at ottawa.ca/devapps.

Concept photo of the North East side of the Hospital
Concept photo of the South East side of the Hospital

Public information session questions

Have a question about the Ottawa Hospital Master Plan? Leave your question below.

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Hello,
It is nothing short of a sin that the historic site of the Experimental Farm has been chosen for the Ottawa Hospital. There will be no way to contain the footprint of the hospital to simply what is being designed. People will, out of necessity, find ways to park and use others areas of the farm to avoid parking fees. Have you used a drone to see the actual footprint of existing hospitals in the City and how far out people park?
With environmental impacts so front and centre, I simply do not understand why this open and formerly protected heritage area would have been chosen when other options existed....and frankly still do exist. Why designate a site to be of historical significance if years later it is destroyed. And there is no question about this, it will be utterly destroyed.
There is time to correct this decision. For our future and the future for generations to come.

Thinkagain 4 days ago

It seems very unlikely that city "planners" and the hospital overlords have any interest in what citizens have to say about the site for the hospital. A basic consideration is why build a "superhospital" when advanced countries and cities are moving away from that model. And then there are the considerations specific to the Dow's Lake site, all of which have been well documented - limited access, unnecessary destruction of important tree canopy and current park space, distance from transit, disincentives to use public transit, etc. - and so far pretty well ignored by the city and the hospital. Apparently, climate change is not real to these "planners", and there is no need to look at best practices elsewhere. Once again Ottawa settles for way below even second best. And at what a huge environmental cost!

SJW 8 days ago

A "Civic" institution hidden behind office buildings and a parking garage. This design does not present a welcoming or open positive image.

This new complex should celebrate Ottawa's healthcare system after the pandemic.

The original “Civic” was a proud community building statement. The stately edifice and graceful stairway provided those that passed by or visited the building in its formative years, a confidence in our public institutions.

The present design is an architectural "bunker" which hides behind berms, flimsy zigzag pathways, a parking garage etc. It is a design which is apologetic about its location.

It is a design which is functionally turned inward having to be constantly explained to the citizens of this city rather than reinforcing a pride in our healthcare system and those that work in it.

BG! 8 days ago

The Experimental Farm is protected against development of any kind. Period. The hospital is not permitted. But, even more obviously, the three or more mixed use (condo) buildings are absolutely unnecessary and not permitted.

Please explain why the existing protection is being ignored.
Please explain why any mixed use (condo) buildings are part of this plan.
Please explain why parking for all this mixed use (condo) is part of this plan.

Thanks,

justonemorebook 15 days ago

I have been at the Civic many times over the years and I also regularly walk in the Experimental Farm. I am deeply dissatisfied with the plan to use the Experimental Farm in any way. It has been a signature green space of our centre city core for over 100 years, and thus, has trees that are over 100 years old. These trees contribute to the cleansing of the air, providing home for birds and animals, contribute to the beauty of the city. They should not be bull-dozed! Also, 'the bowl' (the area near Birch) is one of the most gorgeous landscaped areas I have ever seen. Many people enjoy this space and, indeed, people from the Civic (staff and patients) come here for their lunch or for a rehabilitative walk. Further, this area is already very busy with Dow's Lake and Preston St. It will be even more busy with the large condos being developed here. Having a hospital right on the corner will drastically change the look and feel of the area. Also, visitors to the area will end up parking where they can, and that will spill into the proposed hospital grounds, making it difficult for patient family members to find available parking. I fear that emergency vehicles will find traffic jams in that area and tourism will be disrupted, as well. I very strongly implore you to reconsider this location. Even if you have answers for all of these things, the Experimental Farm should be considered sacred and left as is. Where is the democracy in this decision-making? Please listen to the people. Many of us have spoken out about this. Please listen.

Ba Bryanton 22 days ago

The NCC, having spent time and money researching possible sites, chose Tunney's Pasture as the most appropriate site for the new Civic Hospital. Not only is there good transportation, but it would serve the fast high density developing areas of Hintonburg and Mechanicsville. The Glebe and surrounding areas are already only 10 minutes by ambulance to the Ottawa General.
Taking away a 42 H. portion of the Farm, cutting down 500+ trees and building a modern hospital with its intense night lighting and ambulance and patient traffic will destroy the peace and serenity of the Arboretum, Farm and Gardens. It will negatively impact people, wildlife and farm animals.
The "Farm" is a defining part of our nation's capital. It is unique to Ottawa; no other capital has one within its boundaries. The Agricultural Experimental Farm belongs to ALL Canadians, not just to the residents of Ottawa and it should not be up to the City of Ottawa to decide to start its destruction and demise.

GA about 1 month ago

Why does this website say nothing about the original plan to build at the Tunney's Pasture location? Am I missing something? Why are some comments deleted and why are my other posts not published?

Stittsville about 1 month ago

I am opposed to the hospital plan and the plan to build a new parking lot on the Queen Juliana Park Land on the Experimental Farm .The above ground parking lot is a bad idea for a number of reasons. There has never been an environmental assessment of the new hospital or the planned parking lot. We have no idea what the environmental impact will be of building a concrete parking lot across from Dow's Lake.

Stittsville about 1 month ago

You are widening the trench for the parking lot!!! But not to move the transit stop. Isn't it expensive to widen a trench!?

aaronkmcbride about 2 months ago

It is not too late to do the right thing and change the plan for the location of the Ottawa Hospital. It would be a travesty to build it at Dow's Lake, so close to the Arboretum. Ottawa needs more green space, not less; more and more research is showing the benefits to citizens. There are other locations that are still central and are closer to public transit, such as Tunney's Pasture and LeBreton Flats. Please, please reconsider this decision.

Debbie R. about 2 months ago

Tunney’s is the best site all around. Leave the Farm alone.

Yet Another Concerned Citizen about 2 months ago

Removed by moderator.

NickGrover 2 months ago

Disappointed to see this plan includes a four story parking garage that would require destruction of the Queen Juliana Park. The plan to plant new rooftop trees isn't good enough - new trees won't have the same ecological benefits as older ones, not to mention we should be preserving AND planting trees to improve tree canopy, air quality, and cooling in the city.

There should not be a parking complex above or below ground. All our planning needs to foreground climate action and fast. We can't be encouraging driving with more car space. Instead we should be making this site as transit accessible as possible. Make it incredibly easy and fast for staff and visitors to get to the campus by bus so they do not need to drive. These routes could even be made fare free.

It seems transit access would have been much easier to provide at the original Tunney's site; now it is "not guaranteed" in planning documents. The Tunney's site would also save about 500 trees from being felled to build this campus at the Experimental Farm site... Just an overall lack of vision and concern for climate action, community spaces, and equitable transportation

NickGrover 2 months ago

Destroying the green space would be a tragedy.

David Dunkelman 2 months ago

Based on the magnitude of this project I’m assuming there will be a follow-up public consultation to the one held in June. Can you please confirm the timing for that event. Is there a record of the concerns that were brought forward along with how they are being considered and addressed?

Christoph von Teichman 3 months ago

With so many brownfield sites available and in light of many government and businesses opening up usable space due to a shift in work-from-home accommodations this location seems the wrong choice. Protect green space, reduce heat island effects and follow your own site analysis data posted here:
https://ehq-production-canada.s3.ca-central-1.amazonaws.com/fde2c5fb28901f9ae1dfb0fcad0b20ecab76b94c/original/1622053525/b9164f421de511387c9db76a9061b63e_toh_site_analysis_en.pdf?X-Amz-Algorithm=AWS4-HMAC-SHA256&X-Amz-Credential=AKIAIBJCUKKD4ZO4WUUA%2F20210910%2Fca-central-1%2Fs3%2Faws4_request&X-Amz-Date=20210910T083321Z&X-Amz-Expires=300&X-Amz-SignedHeaders=host&X-Amz-Signature=231528130d87ef54f7aa53bcf94d175298c64307770e7c05f9571c3fef92e0b6

The negatives highly outweigh the benefits, oh except cost! It’s always cheaper to dig up some trees and fields vs doing the work. I truly hope the municipal and provincial governments will listen to its residents and go back to the original plan of tunneys pasture.

rich 3 months ago

Given that the location for this development has already been set adjacent to Dow’s Lake, a popular recreation destination for Ottawa residents and tourists, the Central Experimental Farm, the Arboretum, as well as the Rideau Canal UNESCO world heritage site, the developers of the site have a huge responsibility to uphold the character of the area, enhance the public realm, and to maintain connectivity for active transportation already existing on site. From what I can see, the cycling and walking connections are interrupted and this will create obstacles for public acceptance. The 2500 spot parkade is in a prime location, at the start of a scenic drive, not exactly a gateway structure to set the tone for a drive through the farm. It’s difficult to imagine the structure and see how integrated it will be with the landscape and how an elevated park will be used and maintained year-round. Will there be outdoor spaces for patients and visitors to the facility to help in their recovery? This would be one of the advantages for siting the facility in such a beautiful location.

DH B 3 months ago

I am definitely in agreement with most of the people/writers that the above ground parking building is not acceptable. I really do NOT agree with the present location of the new Civic, having always thought it should be located in Tunney's where there is a great deal more room to expand should more area be required as time goes by. The Experimental Farm is a special spot and one that is unique to Canada. It should be preserved at all costs. Traffic is already at a premium in the residential area around the proposed site and will only be worse as more and more high-rises are built, as they are presently proposed. Sherwood Drive used to be a quiet residential street and is rapidly becoming a speedway for autos in transition to get either to the Queensway or to Carling or Sommerset via side streets off Sherwood. There has to be a better solution!

jens 3 months ago

Given very extensive and legitimate concerns about the suitability of the current site, and the profound and long-lasting consequences of this decision, is there any unequivocal reason not to reconsider the Tunney's Pasture location? Who has responsibility and authority to put the current plans on hold and initiate such a review?

Rebecca, OOE 3 months ago

The EIS conducted does not fully count all of the trees that might be lost should the hospital construction be allowed to proceed. Will the City conduct a full audit and recount of trees by an independent third party?

Diane McIntyre 3 months ago
Page last updated: 19 November 2021, 11:07