The Ottawa Hospital Master Plan

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The Ottawa Hospital’s new Civic campus development, which will be located on Carling Avenue adjacent to Dow’s Lake, will be the major referral centre for Eastern Ontario, Western Quebec and parts of Nunavut, and the Eastern Ontario Trauma Centre. As one of Canada’s largest acute care learning and research hospitals, the new campus will provide a full range of specialized services, research and education for those with the most complex injuries and illness.

Background of the hospital project

  • 2007 - the Ottawa Hospital convened a Steering Committee to develop a Master Plan which concluded the current Civic Campus is too old and would be too difficult and costly to rebuild.
  • 2009 to 2013 - the Ottawa Hospital (TOH) was in discussions with the Government of Canada related to master planning for a new Ottawa Hospital campus and land requirements.
  • 2014 - the Government of Canada commissioned the National Capital Commission to assist in the land transfer process to TOH.
  • December 2015 - the federal government requested a further review of the land options for the new campus and four sites were examined
  • December 2016 - Canadian Heritage requested that the Federal government make the Sir John Carling site available as the future location of the new campus of TOH.
  • May 2017 - the City’s Planning Committee recommended that staff initiate Official Plan and Zoning By-law amendment applications for this federal land use decision.
  • September 2017 to January 2018 – public engagement strategy with nine open houses
  • December 2017 and March 2018 – design sessions with the Urban Design Review Panel
  • February 2018 - PSPC announced a 99-year lease between the Federal Government and TOH for the development of a new campus.
  • May to June 2018 – Official Plan and Zoning By-law amendments approved by Planning Committee and City Council through By-law 2018-198 to a new Institutional I2 Zone

A holding provision, (D07-12-21-20-TOH) was established to ensure a master plan, transportation study, cultural heritage study and master servicing study will be approved by Planning Committee and Council. The holding provision can be lifted once Planning Committee and Council approve the subject Master Plan and its related supporting studies.

Proposal

The proposed Hospital Site is located at 930 Carling Avenue and 520 Preston Street that is approximately 21 hectares in size within Wards 16 and 17 and adjacent to Wards 14 and 15 (see Figure 1).

The site is irregularly shaped and bound by Carling Avenue to the north, Prince of Wales Drive and Preston Street to the east and is loosely bound by the National Capital Commission Scenic Driveway to the south and Maple Drive to the east. The Trillium line (O-Train line) bisects the eastern part of the site.

The primary access for staff and visitors is off both Carling Avenue (across from Champagne Ave) and Prince of Wales Drive, accessing the new 4 storey parking structure.

New Civic Project

Master Plan

Once the Master Plan is approved, individual site plan control applications will be submitted for City review and approval based on the proposed phasing of the hospital master plan.

Due to the size of the project, the new Ottawa Hospital will be completed in phases. The Master Plan currently outlines 10 phases, where the first three phases will prepare the site for the Hospital’s construction set to begin in Phase 4 (2024-2028).

2021: Widen the O-Train trench, enabling the construction of a parking garage

2022: Start of on-site parking garage to be completed end of 2023; select the preferred proponents and long-term partners for the new Civic development

2023: Establish the services and utilities to the Site

2024: Construction begins for four years

2025 to 2027: The transit connection to TOH Campus will be improved with the opening of Dow’s Lake Light Rail Transit (LRT) Station.

2027: Transition management to the new site

2028: Grand opening

2030 to 2048: Future expansions

Timelines and Approval Authority

The target date for the application to be considered by the City’s Planning Committee, is September 09, 2021

Public information session

The City of Ottawa is hosting a public meeting to discuss the new Ottawa Hospital Master Plan on June 29th, 2021 at 6 pm on Zoom.

Presentation

To join the zoom meeting please use:

Meeting link: Zoom link

Meeting ID: 910 5681 7471

Password: 451072

Local number: +1 438 809 7799

Stay Informed and Involved

  1. Register for future notifications about this site plan control application by providing your comments by e-mailing Sean Moore and adding File No. D07-12-21-20-TOH in the subject line.
  2. Access submitted plans and studies regarding this application online at ottawa.ca/devapps.

Concept photo of the North East side of the Hospital
Concept photo of the South East side of the Hospital

The Ottawa Hospital’s new Civic campus development, which will be located on Carling Avenue adjacent to Dow’s Lake, will be the major referral centre for Eastern Ontario, Western Quebec and parts of Nunavut, and the Eastern Ontario Trauma Centre. As one of Canada’s largest acute care learning and research hospitals, the new campus will provide a full range of specialized services, research and education for those with the most complex injuries and illness.

Background of the hospital project

  • 2007 - the Ottawa Hospital convened a Steering Committee to develop a Master Plan which concluded the current Civic Campus is too old and would be too difficult and costly to rebuild.
  • 2009 to 2013 - the Ottawa Hospital (TOH) was in discussions with the Government of Canada related to master planning for a new Ottawa Hospital campus and land requirements.
  • 2014 - the Government of Canada commissioned the National Capital Commission to assist in the land transfer process to TOH.
  • December 2015 - the federal government requested a further review of the land options for the new campus and four sites were examined
  • December 2016 - Canadian Heritage requested that the Federal government make the Sir John Carling site available as the future location of the new campus of TOH.
  • May 2017 - the City’s Planning Committee recommended that staff initiate Official Plan and Zoning By-law amendment applications for this federal land use decision.
  • September 2017 to January 2018 – public engagement strategy with nine open houses
  • December 2017 and March 2018 – design sessions with the Urban Design Review Panel
  • February 2018 - PSPC announced a 99-year lease between the Federal Government and TOH for the development of a new campus.
  • May to June 2018 – Official Plan and Zoning By-law amendments approved by Planning Committee and City Council through By-law 2018-198 to a new Institutional I2 Zone

A holding provision, (D07-12-21-20-TOH) was established to ensure a master plan, transportation study, cultural heritage study and master servicing study will be approved by Planning Committee and Council. The holding provision can be lifted once Planning Committee and Council approve the subject Master Plan and its related supporting studies.

Proposal

The proposed Hospital Site is located at 930 Carling Avenue and 520 Preston Street that is approximately 21 hectares in size within Wards 16 and 17 and adjacent to Wards 14 and 15 (see Figure 1).

The site is irregularly shaped and bound by Carling Avenue to the north, Prince of Wales Drive and Preston Street to the east and is loosely bound by the National Capital Commission Scenic Driveway to the south and Maple Drive to the east. The Trillium line (O-Train line) bisects the eastern part of the site.

The primary access for staff and visitors is off both Carling Avenue (across from Champagne Ave) and Prince of Wales Drive, accessing the new 4 storey parking structure.

New Civic Project

Master Plan

Once the Master Plan is approved, individual site plan control applications will be submitted for City review and approval based on the proposed phasing of the hospital master plan.

Due to the size of the project, the new Ottawa Hospital will be completed in phases. The Master Plan currently outlines 10 phases, where the first three phases will prepare the site for the Hospital’s construction set to begin in Phase 4 (2024-2028).

2021: Widen the O-Train trench, enabling the construction of a parking garage

2022: Start of on-site parking garage to be completed end of 2023; select the preferred proponents and long-term partners for the new Civic development

2023: Establish the services and utilities to the Site

2024: Construction begins for four years

2025 to 2027: The transit connection to TOH Campus will be improved with the opening of Dow’s Lake Light Rail Transit (LRT) Station.

2027: Transition management to the new site

2028: Grand opening

2030 to 2048: Future expansions

Timelines and Approval Authority

The target date for the application to be considered by the City’s Planning Committee, is September 09, 2021

Public information session

The City of Ottawa is hosting a public meeting to discuss the new Ottawa Hospital Master Plan on June 29th, 2021 at 6 pm on Zoom.

Presentation

To join the zoom meeting please use:

Meeting link: Zoom link

Meeting ID: 910 5681 7471

Password: 451072

Local number: +1 438 809 7799

Stay Informed and Involved

  1. Register for future notifications about this site plan control application by providing your comments by e-mailing Sean Moore and adding File No. D07-12-21-20-TOH in the subject line.
  2. Access submitted plans and studies regarding this application online at ottawa.ca/devapps.

Concept photo of the North East side of the Hospital
Concept photo of the South East side of the Hospital

Public information session questions

Have a question about the Ottawa Hospital Master Plan? Leave your question below.

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I think the original recommendation for the Tunney's location made more sense than the proposed Carling location. It would appear that the Carling location was chosen to indulge the idea of a convenient move by the hospital staff. Tunney's with its existing transit infrastructure would facilitate the transit users and adequate parking can be provided for those who drive. I discourage the sprawl in the building layout in the pictures. Why the sprawl? You expect sick patients to walk extended distances between buildings? Build them closer together and surround them with green space but keep point-to-point distances within the buildings short. I personally do not like the idea of what I see as unneccesary destruction of green space.

ottbuddy 5 days ago

First off, the idea of placing Ottawa’s major hospital on a hilly site serviced by Carling and Prince of Wales Drive is totally absurd. The sight across from the current hospital is flat and would allow the heart institute to remain in its current location. Charitable contributors won’t be too pleased when they find the heart institute eventually moved to,the new hospital. Prince of Wales is already overloaded. Disaster if the hospital is built in the proposed location. And perhaps Tunneys is even better than across from the current hospital.
I understand that the traffic plan anticipates traffic will be reduced significantly because of the LRT. What is the traffic reduction estimate and the basis for this estimate?
Most patients coming to a hospital ar usually driven there. This will not change
Most professional staff work varied hours and will drive. If you think otherwise show me the evidence.
Visitors as they will be coming from all over the region will mostly drive. Some will use alternative means. What is the current status and what is the alternative you will be planning for?

Xbones 9 days ago

The Queen Juliana Park immediately across Carling from Champagne Avenue is the only stretch of green space easily accessible to this neighbourhood on foot. It offers intuitive and easy access to the Arboretum and includes a large grassy field, big enough to receive the most liberal designation for dog walking in City parks (short of an enclosed, fully fenced dog-park) i.e.that dogs may be off-leash provided that they are under their owner's control. It is well used by neighbourhood dog owners and the number of dogs has increased since the pandemic even faster than the rate of densification. There is no parking at other larger parks further west such as Fairmont Park (where dogs are not permitted off leash) or Reid Park both of which are a short drive away, should one have a car and care to pack the pooch up for a ride before the daily romp.In the winter, children sled in the park and families cross-country ski on their way to the Arboretum for some easily accessible cross-country ski
What plans are there to provide an easily accessible substitute facility in the immediate vicinity to fulfill these essential functions for urban parents, families and pet owners?

Lesley C 17 days ago

Room to grow?
One need only look at the long history of our current Civic Hospital to appreciate just how much such a world-class hospital facility grows over time. To where, exactly, will the new Ottawa Hospital expand in the future? By further incursion into the Central Experimental Farm? A move across Prince of Wales Drive into the Dominion Arboretum? Or across Preston Street into Commissioners’ Park? Maybe a new Dows Lake Pavilion? The fact is there is no room to grow in the proposed location without the loss of more accessible green space, historic sites and/or tourist attractions . What are the plans in that regard?

Lesley C 17 days ago

This comment says it all so I'm pasting it in again.

How does the mulching of 680 trees, many of which are 50 plus years old, on the proposed site align with the City's Climate Action plan? When you take the loss of these trees along with the 4 acres of Red Pine at Hunt Club that the city plans to turn into a parking lot and the loss of the woods at the new Embassy Row, the combined loss is unfathomable. We need strong action to save what little greenery Ottawa has left after suffering huge canopy loss as a result of Ash Borer. As the temperatures globally go up, our natural environment is even more needed to combat heat waves, flooding and overall biodiversity loss. It's time for strong leadership!

dmp123 20 days ago

Gillian C 17 days ago

The hospital should be located at the Carling location an area zoned as institutional not park.

P.S Tunneys, is not the original location, that was across the street from the current site, and that would be my second choice.

Christopher Tupper 19 days ago

Is the city concerned about mixing tourist/neighbourhood pedestrian/cyclist traffic - those who are visiting our National Historic Buildings - with emergency vehicles on Maple Drive. Does the city think having emergency vehicles and the Central Utility Plant on Maple Drive will negatively impact the experience of visitors to our National Historic site?

L. Foley 22 days ago

1 - Why was Tunney's Pasture, the original recommendation, rejected in favour of destroying park land?
2 - Why is there so much sprawl? This is an urban hospital being built on greenspace - I don't understand why it would have to be 50 acres of spread-out, relatively short buildings, especially on prime park space in the middle of the city? It seems like the aesthetics and car-centrism of the design is being favoured over environmental or practical concerns.

Chazzout 28 days ago

The hospital should be located at the Tunney Pasture site. It’s on transit, and is already a good location for a new building while the Dow’s Lake site is a walk from transit and will take away valuable green space and trees that give relief from heat and pollution caused by the climate emergency. Rethink the location. Do not put so much emphasis on car traffic. The thought of a 4 storey parking garage replacing a park is shocking at this time when the City is urging us all to use active transportation.

Buddy 30 days ago

Has the prospect of acquiring the parking lot at Hickory, Champagne, and Carling been explored? This seems like it could be a better place to expand parking for the new hospital than the Dow's Lake lot, where I'm concerned the planned parking structure will negatively impact the experience of visiting Dow's Lake and the surrounding parkland. The site at Hickory, Champagne, and Carling could, I imagine, include significant underground and overground parking, and it could be connected to the hospital by a pedestrian overpass or tunnel (or both) to ensure a safe and convenient way for people to cross Carling.

dbiddy about 1 month ago

How will this development affect the Trillium Pathway (not mentioned in the second paragraph of the Proposal section on this webpage, I can't help noticing)? Rerouting the pathway from the current Carling Station along the perimeter of the hospital to the corner of Queen Elizabeth and Preston would be fine, as long as there is in fact a wide, lit, dedicated route for cyclists. This could also be an opportunity to improve the Queen Elizabeth-Preston intersection to make it more cycle-friendly.

dbiddy about 1 month ago

It makes NO sense to require people coming to a hospital to walk through a long enclosed overpass from the LRT!

JD Keeler about 1 month ago

Why does your “background history” completely skip the original recommendation of Tunney’s Pasture as the new hospital site? Why didn’t that site get used, it’s already developed, flat, has no earthquake fault, and has transit as well as multiple accesses??! Most importantly, it is NOT a heritage site complete with urgently needed green infrastructure, e.g., mature trees!!

JD Keeler about 1 month ago

We have to stop losing valuable green space to parking lots. Next generations deserve better decisions now. I’m glad designers have considered creating a green space on the parking garage roof but even better would be to have parking underground with a tunnel to the hospital.

Linie about 1 month ago

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I♥booksEtc about 1 month ago

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I♥booksEtc about 1 month ago

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I♥booksEtc about 1 month ago

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I♥booksEtc about 1 month ago

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I♥booksEtc about 1 month ago

Why are you removing the South end of the bike path from the Ottawa River to Dow's lake? We need MORE active transportation facilities, not less.
Where is the bike parking, for staff, for visitors, for patients?
Why such a HUGE parking lot when the hospital is on the transitway? Cars pollute and waste energy compared to transit and bikes. Bikes are also much healthier.

I♥booksEtc about 1 month ago