Water rate structure review

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The City is committed to reviewing the water, wastewater and stormwater rate structure periodically to make sure that it is still serving the needs of our residents and businesses, while still providing the funding necessary to provide exceptional services.

Why is the City reviewing the rate structure?

Water, wastewater and fire supply

Today, the costs to deliver water and wastewater services are recovered through 20 percent from fixed charges and 80 percent from water usage. One of the challenges the City faces is that when there is more conservation, the high reliance on variable cost recovery may lead to inadequate cost recovery; however, the costs required to deliver these services remain the same. To balance water conservation with the cost of delivering services, the City of Ottawa is exploring ways to change how fees are charged.

Stormwater


One of the recommendations the City is exploring is using impervious surfaces captured using aerial imagery as the basis for allocating stormwater charges. Impervious surfaces are areas on a property considered highly resistant to water absorption, such as pavement, asphalt, concrete, brick, building material and structure rooftops.

Although Council preferred the use of impervious surfaces in previous reviews, the lack of readily available data led to the use of property assessment as the measure for allocating stormwater charges for non-residential properties. With technological advancements, City staff can now revisit this cost allocation approach.

Stormwater information for rural properties

In the rural area, drainage is comprised of both municipal drains paid for by each property owner and stormwater services funded by the City’s stormwater charges.

There are over 700 municipal drains in Ottawa which remove excess water from private lands. Most municipal drains are located on private rural agricultural lands and are either ditches or closed systems such as pipes or tiles buried in the ground. Maintenance costs for the drains are recovered from the property owners benefiting from each drain and are not included in the stormwater rate.

In addition to municipal drains, Ottawa’s rural communities benefit from stormwater funded services such as ditches and culverts which divert runoff, prevent roads and buildings from flooding and preserve topsoil and nutrients on farmland. Some rural communities, where there is a higher density of properties (e.g. villages), may also benefit from underground stormwater infrastructure.

The rural stormwater system is comprised of wet ponds, dry ponds, oil and grit separators, inlet control structures and stormwater infrastructure including:

  • 151 km of stormwater pipe drains
  • 4,798 km of ditches
  • 4,109 catch basins
  • more than 5,300 small and medium culverts

The ongoing review seeks to ensure equitable billing for all properties, including all rural areas.

Accessible formats and communication supports are available, upon request.

Rural Consultations

Along with our survey we will be hosting public consultation events in rural wards to provide more information on the review and gather your input. Staff are consulting on the development of a rate structure that considers impervious space as the basis for calculating stormwater fees.

Ward
Date
Location
Time
1 - Orléans East-Cumberland 
Tuesday, June 25
Navan Memorial Centre - 1295 Colonial Rd
7:00 pm
5 – West Carleton-March 
Monday, June 17
West Carleton Community Complex - Roly Armitage Hall - 5670 Carp Rd
6:30 pm
19 – Orléans South-Navan
Tuesday, June 25
Navan Memorial Centre - 1295 Colonial Rd
7:00 pm
20 – Osgoode 
Thursday, May 23
Metcalfe Community Centre - 2785 8th line Rd
6:00 pm
21 - Rideau-Jock Ward 
Thursday, May 9
Richmond Dining Hall - 6121 Perth St
5:30 pm


The City is committed to reviewing the water, wastewater and stormwater rate structure periodically to make sure that it is still serving the needs of our residents and businesses, while still providing the funding necessary to provide exceptional services.

Why is the City reviewing the rate structure?

Water, wastewater and fire supply

Today, the costs to deliver water and wastewater services are recovered through 20 percent from fixed charges and 80 percent from water usage. One of the challenges the City faces is that when there is more conservation, the high reliance on variable cost recovery may lead to inadequate cost recovery; however, the costs required to deliver these services remain the same. To balance water conservation with the cost of delivering services, the City of Ottawa is exploring ways to change how fees are charged.

Stormwater


One of the recommendations the City is exploring is using impervious surfaces captured using aerial imagery as the basis for allocating stormwater charges. Impervious surfaces are areas on a property considered highly resistant to water absorption, such as pavement, asphalt, concrete, brick, building material and structure rooftops.

Although Council preferred the use of impervious surfaces in previous reviews, the lack of readily available data led to the use of property assessment as the measure for allocating stormwater charges for non-residential properties. With technological advancements, City staff can now revisit this cost allocation approach.

Stormwater information for rural properties

In the rural area, drainage is comprised of both municipal drains paid for by each property owner and stormwater services funded by the City’s stormwater charges.

There are over 700 municipal drains in Ottawa which remove excess water from private lands. Most municipal drains are located on private rural agricultural lands and are either ditches or closed systems such as pipes or tiles buried in the ground. Maintenance costs for the drains are recovered from the property owners benefiting from each drain and are not included in the stormwater rate.

In addition to municipal drains, Ottawa’s rural communities benefit from stormwater funded services such as ditches and culverts which divert runoff, prevent roads and buildings from flooding and preserve topsoil and nutrients on farmland. Some rural communities, where there is a higher density of properties (e.g. villages), may also benefit from underground stormwater infrastructure.

The rural stormwater system is comprised of wet ponds, dry ponds, oil and grit separators, inlet control structures and stormwater infrastructure including:

  • 151 km of stormwater pipe drains
  • 4,798 km of ditches
  • 4,109 catch basins
  • more than 5,300 small and medium culverts

The ongoing review seeks to ensure equitable billing for all properties, including all rural areas.

Accessible formats and communication supports are available, upon request.

Rural Consultations

Along with our survey we will be hosting public consultation events in rural wards to provide more information on the review and gather your input. Staff are consulting on the development of a rate structure that considers impervious space as the basis for calculating stormwater fees.

Ward
Date
Location
Time
1 - Orléans East-Cumberland 
Tuesday, June 25
Navan Memorial Centre - 1295 Colonial Rd
7:00 pm
5 – West Carleton-March 
Monday, June 17
West Carleton Community Complex - Roly Armitage Hall - 5670 Carp Rd
6:30 pm
19 – Orléans South-Navan
Tuesday, June 25
Navan Memorial Centre - 1295 Colonial Rd
7:00 pm
20 – Osgoode 
Thursday, May 23
Metcalfe Community Centre - 2785 8th line Rd
6:00 pm
21 - Rideau-Jock Ward 
Thursday, May 9
Richmond Dining Hall - 6121 Perth St
5:30 pm


Page last updated: 19 Apr 2024, 02:51 PM