Leaving No one Behind

9 months ago

Are there communities within Ottawa that you feel are currently facing greater challenges to their health and well-being that require Ottawa-specific public health approaches to improve their well-being?  

How could public health do a better job at serving these communities? 

Are there particular strengths to build upon in Ottawa when it comes to promoting health for these communities?

Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin Email this link

Consultation has concluded

  • LB 7 months ago
    I’d recommend much stronger partnerships with our community health centres. They have been focused on vulnerable communities and the social determinants of health for decades, but like public health, are chronically under resourced. I’d like to see more collective impact approaches and more person-centered design.
    Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin Email this link
  • LymeChild 8 months ago
    Lyme community needs access to help for Lyme and co-infections that ALREADY EXIST but is not validated and covered by OHIP, such as tinctures, herbs, homeopathy, ozone treatments, heavy metal detox, deworming, etc. Also, instead of refusing treatment to individuals, esp. children, because the notoriously unreliable ELISA test has not detected an illness, proceed with treatment for Lyme and co-infections based on symptoms, especially before the afflicted person spends years being debilitated... or dying.
    Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin Email this link
  • Withany 8 months ago
    Does Ottawa Public Health partner with City of Ottawa in regards to accessibility?
    Since falling ill 9 years ago it has been very difficult to leave my house because of the way Ottawa is built to discourage resting. Benches are built with bars in the middle so people can not lay down.
    Having spaces for people with pain, fatigue to get good rest while out in the city can make all the difference in disabled or elderly folks lives. If they were quiet and calming that could also be beneficial for those with sensory issues (part of my illness Chronic Fatigue Syndrome - which 1 in 63 Canadians has. But also common in autism and anxiety)
    Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin Email this link
  • mom2four 8 months ago
    This question doesn't feel fair to residents. We shouldn't have to pit communities against each other for funding. The opioid crisis is statistically the most important and the city needs more safe injection sites, education, detox units, mobile services etc.
    But my area of work is in pre and perinatal supports. Breastfeeding drop ins suffered a huge cut with the reduction of funding and redefinition of services through the Early ON centre. Prenatal classes, breastfeeding drop-ins, parenting services, Health Baby visits and programming sets up families for success and reduces isolation. The funding for programming is based on the flavour of the day, and services are continually needing to validate their stats/program goals and reinvent the wheel
    Hide reply (1)
    Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin Email this link
    • Admin Commented Phil.Jansson 8 months ago
      Thank you for your comments, mom2four. Our intention was not to divide residents, but rather to acknowledge that our social environments affect everyone differently, and there are certain groups that benefit from targeted supports. We appreciate your insights on harm reduction, and parenting supports.
      Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin Email this link
  • Nancy.Worsfold 8 months ago
    In keeping with the "social determinants of health" approach, the communities with the greatest challenges are those living in poverty and experiencing marginalization and racism. The CHRC network have good services, OPH could partner.
    Hide reply (1)
    Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin Email this link
    • Admin Commented Phil.Jansson 8 months ago
      Thank you for your comments, Nancy.
      Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin Email this link
  • hhk 8 months ago
    Individuals who are in poverty are much more likely to experience health concerns and health issues. However, it's important to not force aid or shame those who are in poverty as their health concerns are usually correlated to their income and income inequality related to the population.

    Public health could look at expanding their advocacy for a better poverty reduction strategy and offering free health promotion items and monetary support in terms of supporting those in need.
    Hide reply (1)
    Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin Email this link
    • Admin Commented Phil.Jansson 8 months ago
      Thanks for your comments, hhk. Which organizations in Ottawa do you think Ottawa Public Health should be working with to address these issues?
      Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin Email this link
  • mom2four 8 months ago
    I'd like to add that the person in charge of the city OPH FB page is fantastic! Well done, and thanks for having some fun with the posts.
    Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin Email this link