The Orléans Corridor Secondary Plan Study

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The City is expected to grow to approximately 1, 402 000 people over the course of the next 25 years, an increase of approximately 402,000 people. Growth in the City will need to accommodate a diverse population with varying needs, many of whom will be located in proximity to the new Light Rail O-Train system.

Orléans is an established suburban community in the City that can accommodate new growth and development. The Orléans Corridor Secondary Plan Study is being prepared in order to guide growth to create a mixed use, pedestrian-oriented and complete liveable community. This Secondary Plan is looking to evaluate policies and zoning to improve opportunities for intensification, infill development, housing affordability and employment. Both existing and new community members will be able to rely on the four new O-train stations, access to greenspaces, existing and future local amenities, all while benefiting from the gradual evolution of the historic core of Orléans.

Study Areas

The Orléans Corridor is an area situated between Saint-Joseph Boulevard and Jeanne d’Arc Boulevard in the suburb of Orléans.

As part of the Orléans Corridor Secondary Plan Study, the City has identified six strategic study areas that will accommodate a majority of the growth and development for the corridor. These areas are:

Future O-Train Stations as part of Stage 2

  • Jeanne d’Arc
  • Convent Glen
  • Place d’Orléans
  • Trim

Corridors

  • Jeanne d’Arc Boulevard
  • Saint Joseph Boulevard

Topics and Themes

The Secondary Plan Study for the Orléans Corridor is guided by the following topics and themes:

15-Minute Neighbourhoods; Density, Massing and Scale; Complete Streets and Active Transportation; Public Realm, Public Space and Parks; and Climate. These topics are fundamental in the creation of a complete and liveable community.


15-Minute Neighbourhoods

15-minute neighbourhoods are compact, well-connected places with a clustering of diverse mixed land uses, which includes a range of housing types and affordability, access to food, shops, services, schools, local child care, employment, greenspaces, parks and pathways. 15-minute neighbourhoods allow people to walk to meet their daily or weekly needs by brining destinations closer together. They enable easy, safe and enjoyable connections between destinations.


The Orléans Corridor Secondary Plan aims to create new and improve existing connections to local amenities in order to foster the principles of 15-minute neighbourhoods. As illustrated in, the concentration of amenities around a central corridor or hub minimizes the impact on established Low-rise neighbourhoods.


Density, Massing and Scale

Density, massing and scale are the buildings and structures where people will spend most of their time, including housing and employment. It is necessary for new development to provide a good-range of building types that will serve a variety of functions, including providing affordable housing.

Mobility

Mobility is at the heart of how communities connect. However, mobility doesn’t just stop at methods of transportation, it includes having streets that prioritizes pedestrian comfort and sustainable mobility options.

The Orléans Corridor Secondary Plan will have policies that:

  • Establish that the predominant mode of transportation for development in areas in proximity to a transit station and for the streets leading to stations are walking, cycling, or transit.
  • Reduce automobile activity and car dependence to minimize conflicts with pedestrians and cyclists, to support the use of transit and active transportation, to improve the local environment and reduce greenhouse gas emissions.
  • Manage parking in station areas to promote the use of other modes of transportation and reduce automobile reliance.


Public Realm, Public Space and Parks

Public realm, public space and parks are crucial for creating a liveable community. These are the spaces where people gather to socialize with their neighbours, rest and play after school and work, and become active. These spaces help create a sense of community.


Climate Change

The City has committed to achieving an annual target of net zero greenhouse gas emissions by 2050. This will be accomplished in part through development that is sustainable and zero-emission. Additional measures to reduce GHG emissions and and build a more resilient city are to increase the local tree canopy, reduce dependency on single-occupancy vehicles and make most trips by walking, cycling and public transit.


Timelines

On March 4, 2020, over 200 people attended a presentation and question and answer on the project. Currently, staff have taken the feedback and are summarizing preliminary initiatives based on consultation and research. In the coming months, you can expect:

  • Public Open House (November 2021)
  • Complete technical circulation of proposed Secondary Plan policies (December 2021)
  • Prepare staff report to Committee (Q1 or Q22 of 2022)
  • Committee presentation and Council consideration of recommendations (Q1/Q2 of 2022)

We will need your input in our review of the Orléans Corridor. We want to ensure future development results in liveable, resilient, desirable neighbourhoods that support transit and provide the highest quality of life possible.

The City is expected to grow to approximately 1, 402 000 people over the course of the next 25 years, an increase of approximately 402,000 people. Growth in the City will need to accommodate a diverse population with varying needs, many of whom will be located in proximity to the new Light Rail O-Train system.

Orléans is an established suburban community in the City that can accommodate new growth and development. The Orléans Corridor Secondary Plan Study is being prepared in order to guide growth to create a mixed use, pedestrian-oriented and complete liveable community. This Secondary Plan is looking to evaluate policies and zoning to improve opportunities for intensification, infill development, housing affordability and employment. Both existing and new community members will be able to rely on the four new O-train stations, access to greenspaces, existing and future local amenities, all while benefiting from the gradual evolution of the historic core of Orléans.

Study Areas

The Orléans Corridor is an area situated between Saint-Joseph Boulevard and Jeanne d’Arc Boulevard in the suburb of Orléans.

As part of the Orléans Corridor Secondary Plan Study, the City has identified six strategic study areas that will accommodate a majority of the growth and development for the corridor. These areas are:

Future O-Train Stations as part of Stage 2

  • Jeanne d’Arc
  • Convent Glen
  • Place d’Orléans
  • Trim

Corridors

  • Jeanne d’Arc Boulevard
  • Saint Joseph Boulevard

Topics and Themes

The Secondary Plan Study for the Orléans Corridor is guided by the following topics and themes:

15-Minute Neighbourhoods; Density, Massing and Scale; Complete Streets and Active Transportation; Public Realm, Public Space and Parks; and Climate. These topics are fundamental in the creation of a complete and liveable community.


15-Minute Neighbourhoods

15-minute neighbourhoods are compact, well-connected places with a clustering of diverse mixed land uses, which includes a range of housing types and affordability, access to food, shops, services, schools, local child care, employment, greenspaces, parks and pathways. 15-minute neighbourhoods allow people to walk to meet their daily or weekly needs by brining destinations closer together. They enable easy, safe and enjoyable connections between destinations.


The Orléans Corridor Secondary Plan aims to create new and improve existing connections to local amenities in order to foster the principles of 15-minute neighbourhoods. As illustrated in, the concentration of amenities around a central corridor or hub minimizes the impact on established Low-rise neighbourhoods.


Density, Massing and Scale

Density, massing and scale are the buildings and structures where people will spend most of their time, including housing and employment. It is necessary for new development to provide a good-range of building types that will serve a variety of functions, including providing affordable housing.

Mobility

Mobility is at the heart of how communities connect. However, mobility doesn’t just stop at methods of transportation, it includes having streets that prioritizes pedestrian comfort and sustainable mobility options.

The Orléans Corridor Secondary Plan will have policies that:

  • Establish that the predominant mode of transportation for development in areas in proximity to a transit station and for the streets leading to stations are walking, cycling, or transit.
  • Reduce automobile activity and car dependence to minimize conflicts with pedestrians and cyclists, to support the use of transit and active transportation, to improve the local environment and reduce greenhouse gas emissions.
  • Manage parking in station areas to promote the use of other modes of transportation and reduce automobile reliance.


Public Realm, Public Space and Parks

Public realm, public space and parks are crucial for creating a liveable community. These are the spaces where people gather to socialize with their neighbours, rest and play after school and work, and become active. These spaces help create a sense of community.


Climate Change

The City has committed to achieving an annual target of net zero greenhouse gas emissions by 2050. This will be accomplished in part through development that is sustainable and zero-emission. Additional measures to reduce GHG emissions and and build a more resilient city are to increase the local tree canopy, reduce dependency on single-occupancy vehicles and make most trips by walking, cycling and public transit.


Timelines

On March 4, 2020, over 200 people attended a presentation and question and answer on the project. Currently, staff have taken the feedback and are summarizing preliminary initiatives based on consultation and research. In the coming months, you can expect:

  • Public Open House (November 2021)
  • Complete technical circulation of proposed Secondary Plan policies (December 2021)
  • Prepare staff report to Committee (Q1 or Q22 of 2022)
  • Committee presentation and Council consideration of recommendations (Q1/Q2 of 2022)

We will need your input in our review of the Orléans Corridor. We want to ensure future development results in liveable, resilient, desirable neighbourhoods that support transit and provide the highest quality of life possible.

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Orléans Corridor Secondary Plan

over 1 year

Stage 2 of the LRT system will build on the current Confederation and Trillium Line lines, adding 40 kilometres of track farther east, west and south. Stations at Jeanne d’Arc, Convent Glen (Orléans Boulevard), Place d’Orléans and Trim will be among 23 new stations being added as part of Stage 2, which is planned to be operational for 2023. Two additional stations – at the Orléans Town Centre and at Tenth Line – have been identified for the future.

We have pinned the locations of the new stations on this map. Tell us your ideas for the community's future around these stations by placing your own pins using the following categories:

  • Mobility: Where are there hinderances to physical movement, especially on foot, bike or current transit?
  • Gathering Places: What places do you like to go to meet friends, family and neighbours?
  • Community Landmarks: What iconic landmarks are most important to keep in your neighbourhood?

Page last updated: 06 October 2021, 12:23