Draft Budget 2021

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Consultation has concluded

It's your city and your budget, so we want to hear from you! Your feedback helps inform the City’s budget priorities and contributes to decisions about investments in services that you want and need. Using this online tool, you can ask questions, or share ideas about the budget.

How the City budget works

Watch a short video and learn the basics of how the City budget works.

For more information on understanding the City budget, visit https://ottawa.ca/en/city-hall/budget/understanding-your-city-budget.

Have your say

Share your feedback:

  • Submit a question below
  • Fill out the budget survey below
  • Submit your ideas to your Ward Councillor
  • Follow and communicate with us on Facebook and Twitter @ottawacity, using the hashtag #ottbudget
  • Call 3-1-1 (TTY: 613-580-2401). Rural residents call 613-580-2400.

Opportunities for participation in our budget process

The draft budget is developed in the summer and fall. During this time, members of the community can provide input by asking questions, communicating with the Mayor and Council, and completing surveys. There are Councillor led public consultation sessions for you to share your views with Council. A list of sessions that were held is available on this page.

The draft budget presentation and web cast is Wednesday, November 4. If you are interested in the budget of a specific City service, the City Services chart will show you where to look. Draft budget books are published on https://ottawa.ca/en/city-hall/budget.

Each standing committee or board will review the budget of specific service areas that reports to them. These meeting dates are published on this page. At the meetings, there is an opportunity for community delegations to register and make a brief presentation to the Standing Committee.

On Wednesday, December 9 Council will approve the 2021 budget. Once the budget books are updated, they are posted on https://ottawa.ca/en/city-hall/budget.

City services and standing committee/external board reporting structure

A list of all City Services, the department name, and the Standing Committee that reviews the budget is provided on this page if you wish to look at specific budget details.

For more budget information visit https://ottawa.ca/en/city-hall/budget.

It's your city and your budget, so we want to hear from you! Your feedback helps inform the City’s budget priorities and contributes to decisions about investments in services that you want and need. Using this online tool, you can ask questions, or share ideas about the budget.

How the City budget works

Watch a short video and learn the basics of how the City budget works.

For more information on understanding the City budget, visit https://ottawa.ca/en/city-hall/budget/understanding-your-city-budget.

Have your say

Share your feedback:

  • Submit a question below
  • Fill out the budget survey below
  • Submit your ideas to your Ward Councillor
  • Follow and communicate with us on Facebook and Twitter @ottawacity, using the hashtag #ottbudget
  • Call 3-1-1 (TTY: 613-580-2401). Rural residents call 613-580-2400.

Opportunities for participation in our budget process

The draft budget is developed in the summer and fall. During this time, members of the community can provide input by asking questions, communicating with the Mayor and Council, and completing surveys. There are Councillor led public consultation sessions for you to share your views with Council. A list of sessions that were held is available on this page.

The draft budget presentation and web cast is Wednesday, November 4. If you are interested in the budget of a specific City service, the City Services chart will show you where to look. Draft budget books are published on https://ottawa.ca/en/city-hall/budget.

Each standing committee or board will review the budget of specific service areas that reports to them. These meeting dates are published on this page. At the meetings, there is an opportunity for community delegations to register and make a brief presentation to the Standing Committee.

On Wednesday, December 9 Council will approve the 2021 budget. Once the budget books are updated, they are posted on https://ottawa.ca/en/city-hall/budget.

City services and standing committee/external board reporting structure

A list of all City Services, the department name, and the Standing Committee that reviews the budget is provided on this page if you wish to look at specific budget details.

For more budget information visit https://ottawa.ca/en/city-hall/budget.

CLOSED: This discussion has concluded.
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    What is the specific increase in development charges between 2019, 2020, and 2021, and what is the % increase that represents?

    Fencerman asked 6 months ago

    Thank you for your inquiry and interest in the budget process and development charges. For development charges, while the rate increases yearly, the increase varies by area and unit type. The area-specific development charges are forecasted for both residential and non-residential development and for inside the greenbelt, outside the greenbelt and rural areas. For example, in 2019 the area-specific residential development charge rate located inside the greenbelt, for a single and semi-detached unit, increased by $5,427 or 21.61%. For your convenience, the attached chart provides specific rate increases by amount and per cent for 2019 and 2020. After the Infrastructure Construction Price Index is released by Statistics Canada, in the spring, the 2021 development charge rates will be calculated and applied on October 1, 2021. Additional information concerning development charges can be found at Development Charges | City of Ottawa.

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    I hope you will consider some money for residential street improvements When you have a large number of seniors walking and the streets are all bumpy and cracked walkers and canes get caught & you have falls. We have no sidewalks so we walk on the streets. Maple from the post office to Beaverwood is terrible. Highcroft is not much better and people cut through here to get tot he village from Manotick Estates.

    Tasha asked 6 months ago

    The Public Works and Environmental Services department is responsible for minor repairs of roadways in Ottawa. Public Works and Environmental Services takes a proactive approach to maintaining potholes year-round and filled over 288,000 in 2019. Both City and contracted crews are assigned ‘beats’ or a list of street segments to perform asphalt repairs. Pothole repairs are prioritized both by road classification and by size/severity of pothole. In addition to PWES' response on overall strategy in regards to pothole repair and maintenance practices, the most effective method to having a repair completed is by reporting it to 3-1-1 or visit www.ottawa.ca to create a Service Request which our staff will review as soon as possible.

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    Would the city consider requiring parking permits for on-street parking outside of the downtown core (excluding rural areas)? It might encourage people to reduce the number of cars that they own, improve pedestrian safety on streets with no sidewalks, and provide a source of revenue for the city. On my small crescent and the street adjacent to it there are at least 20 vehicles parked on the street in the evenings and overnight every day. Even at $30 or $40 per month, this would add up to significant revenue for the city that could be used for road repair and maintenance, as well as bicycle and pedestrian infrastructure. For homes that have overnight visitors, the city could follow Waterloo’s example of requiring on-line or telephone registration for visitors, up to a maximum number of days per year for each license plate.

    Jane H asked 6 months ago

    Thank you for your question and suggestions. The existing parking policy does not include On-Street permit requirements city-wide. However, the City’s On-Street Permit Policy does allow for the creation of permit zones in a residential area, but this is typically triggered by residents of the area, and requires demonstration of a consensus, via a petition from the neighbourhood. There might be some consideration given to this approach through the City of Ottawa’s Energy Evolution Strategy, so maybe something the City of Ottawa investigates in the future.

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    After the increase in home sale prices in 2020 compared to 2019, what will be the effective property tax rate paid per $1000 of home value in 2021, compared to in 2020 and 2019?

    Fencerman asked 6 months ago

    Thank you for your recent feedback on the City of Ottawa’s draft Budget 2021 that we received through Engage Ottawa.

    An increase in assessed property value is not directly proportionate to an increase in property taxes. The City of Ottawa has excellent on-line information that includes a short video on how property values are related to property taxes - https://ottawa.ca/en/living-ottawa/taxes/understanding-your-property-tax-bill#how-your-property-taxes-are-calculated. I would encourage you to read that information on our site and watch the video –  I am confident that it will both answer your questions and provide you with assurance that your property taxes will not increase at the same rate as your assessed property value. 

    Note that the Municipal Property Assessment Corporation (MPAC) has postponed the planned 2021 property reassessment exercise to 2022. As a result, all properties in the province will be billed based on their 2020 assessment value. There will be minimal reassessment impact. 

    In 2022, once MPAC effects the revised assessment values, if your property value increase is higher than the average residential increase for the City you will see a slightly higher than announced increase on you tax bill during the new tax cycle. Conversely if your property value increase is lower than the average residential increase for the City you will see a slightly lower than announced increase. This is referred to as the impact of reassessment. Reassessment causes some shifting of taxes between properties within the property class, but the City does not collect any additional revenue. 

    If you have outstanding questions after reviewing the information, please feel free to follow up with another inquiry.

    Thank you again for your feedback.

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    Restrictions given the pandemic are expected to continue and this greatly affects citizen wellbeing. To what extent and how quickly can Ottawa adopt the winter design guidelines (such as those used by Edmonton) https://www.wintercityedmonton.ca/winter-city-design-view-street/ These are cost effective measures on outdoor use, safer streets that are both covid-safe and improve experience of the community

    EmHill asked 7 months ago

    Thank you for your interest and support of a vibrant and healthy winter season in Ottawa. In terms of winter experiences, as residents we are fortunate to enjoy the Rideau Canal (a UNESCO World Heritage Site), many kilometres of groomed cross-country, snowshoeing and snowmobiling trails, downhill skiing in close proximity, and numerous outdoor arenas and toboggan hills dotted throughout our communities. We agree that this year in particular, for both wellbeing and economic reasons, it will be important for the City and its key economic and social agency partners to emphasize the need to embrace our winter climate and seek opportunities to safely participate in outdoor recreational and commercial activities.

     

    The City is working on a series of initiatives to support businesses through the winter season including an enhanced winter patio program and a supplemental snow removal program in downtown BIA districts to facilitate new business models including curbside pick-up. We are developing a social media campaign that will communicate the breadth of winter experiences across our city (recreational, artistic, cultural) and encourage residents to participate and engage. Our partners at Ottawa Tourism, following the great success of their “MyOttawa Pass” campaign this summer and a wonderful rural tourism campaign collaboration with the City, will be actively promoting winter experiences and attractions locally and within Ontario (and within Quebec as appropriate based on public health guidance).

     

    With respect to the City of Edmonton’s winter city initiatives, city staff have just participated in a webinar featuring Edmonton’s Winter Planner as well as other cities to exchange ideas for winter activities and discuss how COVID has factored into many of the established winter programs. While our current situation presents challenges it has also provided many opportunities to pilot different initiatives, which will hopefully enhance Ottawa’s vibrancy during the winter.  

     

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    Why is Conley Road not paved nor slated to be paved for 7 years?? Every other road around us is paved!! People ask us if we've paid our taxes because it is so bad.

    Sarah Kennedy asked 7 months ago

    Thank you for your inquiry and interest in the budget. City infrastructure projects, including road renewal, are reviewed, prioritized and scheduled as part of the annual budget preparation. Priorities are weighed against competing needs and available funding. 

    Conley Road from Franktown Road to Mansfield Road is currently on the construction forecast plan, expected to be upgraded, from gravel to pavement in the next four to seven years. This work is dependent on budget approvals and subjected to coordination with other projects. Staff will continue to assess the overall condition of Conley Road.

    Conley Road, north of Mansfield Road has also been assessed and it is not scheduled for rehabilitation. Staff will also continue to monitor the overall condition of this portion of Conley Road. 

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    Hello, what is being done by the City of Ottawa to reduce plastic waste?

    Ashwin asked 6 months ago

    The City of Ottawa is currently developing a Solid Waste Master Plan which will provide the overall framework, direction, goals and targets for solid waste management including plastic. This Plan will explore opportunities and options, and make recommendations based on the 5R’s of waste management hierarchy of  reduction, reuse, diversion, recovery and residual disposal of Ottawa’s waste for the next 30 years. The goal is to ensure that our municipality's waste is managed in the most sustainable manner possible. 


    Truly addressing the issue of reducing plastic requires a collective effort amongst all levels of government, industry and the public also needs to play a role in changing their purchasing and consumption habits. Although our jurisdiction as a municipality in influencing the generation and reduction in the production of plastic waste is limited, there is recognition that the City has a role to play and will be looking at ways to reduce the use of plastic through this Plan. 


    This Plan is being developed in three phases. Phase 1, which was completed earlier this year, explained “where we are” as a City; Phase 2 of the plan is currently under development and will thoroughly detail “where we are going” with Phase 3 bringing forward the draft strategy for short term (5-year) implementation, with a full final strategy coming in 2022. As part of Phase 2 we are looking at different options to meet the needs and goals of the Plan, including how to support waste reduction efforts by residents and in City operations.


    The Federal government also made an announcement in October this year to ban six single-use items in 2021, with regulations to facilitate this being finalised next year. The City is about to begin developing a strategy for the elimination of single-use and foamed plastics in City Programs and Services. As part of this initiative, the City has been installing refillable drinking water bottle stations in City facilities to reduce the use of disposable (one-time use) water bottles. 

    On November 4, the City’s draft budget was presented to Council, and the public. In the weeks to follow, the budget is reviewed by the Standing Committees. Citizens have the opportunity to register (www.ottawa.ca) and make a presentation at any of the Standing Committee meetings.

    If you would like more information on the Solid Waste Master Plan, and to be notified of future updates and engagement opportunities, please visit our page on Engage Ottawa.

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    How are property taxes calculated? There is the MPAC assessment and the mill rate. How do these work in the calculations? What part does comp sales in my neighbourhood play?

    Brenda B-F asked 6 months ago

    Thank you for your recent feedback on the City of Ottawa’s draft Budget 2021 that we received through Engage Ottawa.

    The City of Ottawa has excellent on-line information that includes a short video on how property taxes are calculated - https://ottawa.ca/en/living-ottawa/taxes/understanding-your-property-tax-bill#how-your-property-taxes-are-calculated. I would encourage you to read that information on our site and watch the video. I am confident that it will answer your questions.

    Note that as a result of MPAC postponing their planned 2021 property reassessment exercise until 2022, all properties in the province will be billed based on their 2020 assessment value. There will be minimal reassessment impact. 

    In 2022, once MPAC effects the revised assessment values, if your property value increase is higher than the average residential increase for the City you will see a slightly higher than announced increase on you tax bill during the new tax cycle. Conversely if your property value increase is lower than the average residential increase for the City you will see a slightly lower than announced increase. This is referred to as the impact of reassessment. Reassessment causes some shifting of taxes between properties within the property class, but the City does not collect any additional revenue. 

    If you have outstanding questions after reviewing the information, please feel free to follow up with another inquiry.

    Thank you again for your feedback.

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    Improving biking access and accessibility for those with disability is cheaper per capita than building more roads and parking. Yet the city says it has no money for biking infrastructure. Safer roads for bikes saves lives yet the city does not invest in separating bikes from cars. Why is the evidence being ignored: https://www.theguardian.com/environment/bike-blog/2020/feb/12/investing-in-cycling-pays-off-but-ministers-are-ignoring-the-evidence

    EmHill asked 7 months ago

    In 2020, Council approved the Strategic Roads Safety Action Plan which is guided by the theme of “Think Safety, Act Safely” and focuses efforts and resources where they are needed most to have the greatest impact on reducing collisions resulting in serious injury or death. The new plan is data-driven, has measurable outcomes, and aligns with the principles of a safe systems approach and Vision Zero.  In the 2021 Budget, staff have identified $107k for the Cycling Safety Improvement Program, as well as significant investment to plan, design, and construct cycling facilities as identified in the Ottawa Cycling Plan.

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    Another source of income for the City is parking and speeding fines. A recent review of 29 dangerous intersection was costed at $32 million, but there is only $1 million is available to work on one main intersection and very minor adjustments to 10 others. Road safety should be a priority with so many death and serious injuries every year. I have learnt that 4 speed cameras brought in $1 million in fines. Why does the City not install more speed cameras making roads safer and bringing in revenue to pay for improvement of dangerous intersections?

    NancyBiggs asked 7 months ago

    No new cameras have been included in the budget as the City is continuing with the Pilot program. Staff will be evaluating the effectiveness of the speed cameras at lowering operating speeds in areas where they are installed, reviewing other potential locations, and bringing this information to Transportation Committee in 2021.