City Budget 2022

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It's your city and your budget, so we want to hear from you! Your feedback helps inform the City’s budget priorities and contributes to decisions about investments in services that you want and need. Using this online tool, you can ask questions, or share ideas about the budget.

How the City budget works

Watch a short video and learn the basics of how the City budget works.

For more information on understanding the City budget, visit Ottawa.ca.

Have your say

Share your feedback:

  • Submit a question below
  • Fill out the budget survey below
  • Submit your ideas to your Ward Councillor
  • Follow and communicate with us on Facebook and Twitter @ottawacity, using the hashtag #OttBudget
  • Call 3-1-1 (TTY: 613-580-2401). Rural residents call 613-580-2400
  • Accessible formats and communication supports are available, upon request

Opportunities for participation in our budget process

The draft budget is developed in the summer and fall. During this time, members of the community can provide input by asking questions, communicating with the Mayor and Council, and completing surveys. There are Councillor led public consultation sessions for you to share your views with Council. A list of sessions that were held is available on this page.

The draft budget presentation and web cast is Wednesday, November 3, 2021. If you are interested in the budget of a specific City service, the City Services chart will show you where to look. Draft budget books are published on Ottawa.ca.

Each standing committee or board will review the budget of specific service areas that reports to them. These meeting dates are published on this page, and on Ottawa.ca. At the meetings, there is an opportunity for community delegations to register and make a brief presentation to the Standing Committee.

On Wednesday, December 8, 2021 Council will approve the 2022 budget. The budget books are updated, and posted on Ottawa.ca.

City services and standing committee/external board reporting structure

A list of all City Services, the department name, and the Standing Committee that reviews the budget is provided on this page if you wish to look at specific budget details. The list will indicate which standing committee will review the budget of a specific service.

For more budget information, visit Ottawa.ca.

It's your city and your budget, so we want to hear from you! Your feedback helps inform the City’s budget priorities and contributes to decisions about investments in services that you want and need. Using this online tool, you can ask questions, or share ideas about the budget.

How the City budget works

Watch a short video and learn the basics of how the City budget works.

For more information on understanding the City budget, visit Ottawa.ca.

Have your say

Share your feedback:

  • Submit a question below
  • Fill out the budget survey below
  • Submit your ideas to your Ward Councillor
  • Follow and communicate with us on Facebook and Twitter @ottawacity, using the hashtag #OttBudget
  • Call 3-1-1 (TTY: 613-580-2401). Rural residents call 613-580-2400
  • Accessible formats and communication supports are available, upon request

Opportunities for participation in our budget process

The draft budget is developed in the summer and fall. During this time, members of the community can provide input by asking questions, communicating with the Mayor and Council, and completing surveys. There are Councillor led public consultation sessions for you to share your views with Council. A list of sessions that were held is available on this page.

The draft budget presentation and web cast is Wednesday, November 3, 2021. If you are interested in the budget of a specific City service, the City Services chart will show you where to look. Draft budget books are published on Ottawa.ca.

Each standing committee or board will review the budget of specific service areas that reports to them. These meeting dates are published on this page, and on Ottawa.ca. At the meetings, there is an opportunity for community delegations to register and make a brief presentation to the Standing Committee.

On Wednesday, December 8, 2021 Council will approve the 2022 budget. The budget books are updated, and posted on Ottawa.ca.

City services and standing committee/external board reporting structure

A list of all City Services, the department name, and the Standing Committee that reviews the budget is provided on this page if you wish to look at specific budget details. The list will indicate which standing committee will review the budget of a specific service.

For more budget information, visit Ottawa.ca.

CLOSED: This discussion has concluded.
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    Vanier has benefited from urban densification. The neighborhood's character is changing with each bungalow that is replaced by upscale townhomes. This has led to an increase in property tax revenues, in absolute terms, year-over-year. How will the city allocate the new revenue to improve public transit from Vanier to the rest of the downtown core (where most work), and to improve traffic flow within Vanier (i.e. with densification comes more cars with fewer parking spaces).

    coblenis asked about 1 year ago

    Thank you for reaching out, we appreciate your feedback and subsequent questions.

    Regarding transit service availability and expansion from Vanier to downtown - options for new service, additional trips, or route amendments in existing areas with increased transit ridership or increased demand for specific destinations will be assessed according to guidelines in our Transit Service and Fare Policy manual.  Any potential advantage to customers must, cumulatively, outweigh the disadvantages.  Furthermore, any proposed changes must not compromise our Minimum Financial Performance Standard.  

    OC Transpo plans the frequency of service and bus types on a route according to observed historical ridership information and Council-approved service capacity standards. This standard sets the average number of customers on board a bus. 

    Where ridership demand has exceeded or is projected to soon exceed the offered capacity (for example with an increase in general population to an area, or with a new large employment site), the capacity will be increased at the next available opportunity.  Trips that operated with lower capacity buses may be converted to operate with higher capacity buses.  Where all trips already operate with the highest capacity buses (double deckers), the frequency may be increased by adding a new trip.  Where the offered capacity significantly exceeds the ridership demand, the reverse process may be followed.

    Please note that there is no immediate change to OC Transpo bus routes in the areas that are intensifying or expanding in 2021 or early 2022. In the future, and as part of the recovery from Covid-19 as the City economy reopens, there may be possibilities for improved access to bus service in your area.

    We do appreciate your understanding. Should you have any further comments or questions about transit service, you may reach us directly at 613-560-5000 or via our customer feedback form

    Regarding the second part of your question, the following projects in the 2022 Budget from Transportation Planning contribute to improving transportation in the area:

    • The Transportation Master Plan, together with the accompanying Ottawa Cycling Plan and Ottawa Pedestrian Plan, is the City’s blueprint for planning, building and operating its walking, cycling, transit and road networks over the next several decades. The TMP identifies projects to address mobility needs in both suburban growth areas as well as existing urban neighbourhoods where intensification is occurring. Funds from the 2022 Budget support the update of the TMP and are used to conduct background studies on relevant issues, acquire and analyze transportation data, develop policies and guidelines in accordance with the TMP objectives and monitor transportation trends. Ottawa’s road and transit networks will be reviewed as part of the Transportation Master Plan update which is currently on-going. 
    • The 2022 Budget also includes funding for Rapid Transit Environmental Assessments (EA) Studies, including two studies in the Vanier area:
      • The VIA Rail – Trainyards Multi-Use Pathway Connection EA will look to provide a connection between the VIA Rail Station and the Trainyards area. 
      • The St. Laurent Boulevard Transit Priority Study (Hemlock to Innes Road) will identify measures to improve transit service in the corridor and safety for all road users. 

     

    Another project that will help improve transportation in the area is the recently approved Montreal-Blair Road Transit Priority Corridor Environmental Assessment (EA) Study – Recommendations. This EA and Recommended Plan was approved by Council on September 1, 2021. While funding is subject to future budgets, the recommended plan and functional design for transit priority measures and active transportation improvements on Montreal Road (St. Laurent Boulevard to Shefford Road) and Blair Road (Montreal Road to Blair Station). The recommended plan included the following key benefits: 

    • Implementation of bus-only lanes and queue jump lanes;
    • Support new bus routes and services;
    • Improve bus stop locations and amenities;
    • Improve multi-modal connectivity to Blair and Montreal stations, as well as to adjacent communities, employment centres and commercial uses; and, 
    • Improve road safety for all users.


    The City continues to leverage development projects along large road corridors such as Beechwood and McArthur with a special focus on areas with high levels of re-development. Efforts are being made to further extend the protected cycling tracks along these corridors where opportunities exist.  Cycling levels along the Beechwood corridor have almost returned to pre-Covid levels with just over 100,000 trips/year.

    We are also undertaking the renewal of Montreal Road. The Montreal Road Revitalization project includes the renewal of Montreal Road, between North River Road and St. Laurent Boulevard, and North River from Selkirk Street to the North River Road cul-de-sac. This $64 million dollar investment includes the replacement of underground gaining infrastructure but also includes above ground improvements, including:

    • Construct a three-lane cross section between Vanier Parkway and St. Laurent Boulevard that includes two eastbound lanes, one westbound lane and cycling tracks/lanes in both directions.
    • Bury overhead Hydro lines between North River Road and L’Eglise Street.
    • Implement streetscaping features along Montreal Road, including but not limited to new street furniture, streetlights, trees, concrete sidewalks and paver stones.
    • Review and improve bus stop and bus shelter locations.

    The Montreal Road Revitalization project started in mid-June 2019 with utility relocation work. Major construction work began in 2020 and is anticipated to be completed in late 2022. To stay up to date on the project’s progress, sign up for the Montreal Road Revitalization e-newsletter.

    We hope the above information was helpful, thanks again for reaching out.

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    Thank you for sharing the information about the municipal taxes collected by ward. Can you share similar data for the city's spending by ward, broken down by categories in so far as possible. The previous question about the amount spent on one road in Barrhaven makes me wonder how much was spent on roads in other wards, for example.

    garethh asked 12 months ago

    Thank you for your follow-up question.

     

    You can find the 2022 Tax and Rate Supported Expenditure table and the 2022 Capital Program table here. You will find that they are broken down by service area (categories), as per your request. Additionally, you can find the Citywide summary for your information here. This document provides a high-level overview of the Citywide investments and we’re hopeful that you will find this useful as well.

     

    Again, we appreciate your interest in Budget 2022 and encourage you to follow City Council this Wednesday, December 8th when the draft Budget will be voted on.

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    Hello, Could you provide data on the following: Do central urban communities that are more intensified collect more property tax dollars than suburban communities? Are central urban intensified communities subsidizing sprawling communities? And if so, why aren't suburban communities taxed at a higher rate to pay for the sprawl? Case in point: recently a capital project was undertaken to widen Strandherd drive at a cost of 112 million dollars. Barrhaven has a total of 24000 households, so if each household paid $5k in property tax that would cover the cost of the road widening, with only a few dollars left over for all other city services. How were other services delivered to Barrhaven if all the property tax dollars were spent on widening Strandherd?

    neil.mispelaar asked about 1 year ago

    Good day.

    Thank you for your inquiry.

    Taxation in Ontario is strictly legislated and prescribed in the Municipal ActSection 312 allows Municipalities to set rates for:

    • A General levy, which is imposed on all properties listed in the Assessment Act.  
    • A Special Area Levy, which is imposed on a specific geographic area within the Municipality for a service provided by the Municipality within the geographic area (e.g. transit, fire).


    There is currently no evidence that there is a difference in the level of service for the specific example provided offered consistently year over year between urban and suburban properties.

    I have included a breakdown of taxes by ward in 2021 for your information.

    Thank you for your interest in Budget 2022.

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    The City of Ottawa strongly supports infill development. Our Bay Ward Councillor appears to be an advocate for multi-unit residential infill development in my Woodpark neighbourhood that consists of single unit family homes. Information is not readily available as to who will be responsible for paying for the infrastructure to support this type of development promoted by the city. Are local residents responsible for these infrastructure costs through paying higher taxes and fee increases? Or are there provisions that any developer must assume all costs to ensure that the appropriate infrastructure (green space, waste management, sewers, water, utilities etc.) to support this type of development?

    WPgreen asked about 1 year ago

    Intensification will be using existing available capacity in the City’s local water and sewer networks.  It will also be subject to on-site stormwater management controls. The Infrastructure Master Plan update is expected to recommend new programs that will evaluate the cumulative impacts of intensification and identify any upgrades needed for local water, sanitary, and stormwater systems, as well as the required funding sources.  The IMP will also identify upgrades to trunk water and wastewater systems needed to support both intensification and greenfield development.  These projects will be funded largely by Development Charges.  Each property owner is responsible for the cost to connect to the existing systems. For larger intensification projects that are subject to a site plan control process, the developer could be responsible for the cost of local system upgrades if it is determined that there is insufficient capacity available for the development.

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    Hi, I would like to know what cycling and pedestrian infrastructure projects will be funded in the coming budget.

    ddomen613 asked about 1 year ago

    Thank you for your recent inquiry about cycling and pedestrian infrastructure through the Engage Ottawa platform.

     

    Public Works and Environmental Services has a number of programs that improve safety on the right of way for pedestrians, cyclists, motorists and motorcyclists. The programs and their draft 2022 budget amounts are listed below:

     

    Draft Budget

    Program/Project

    Description

     

    $832K

     

    Cycling Network Snow Clearing

    Clearing of snow and ice in cycling lanes to ensure cyclists can make use of the active transportation network safely

     

    $900K

     

    Snow Clearing of Park-and-Rides

    Clearing snow in OC Transpo park-and-rides to ensure residents can park their cars and use public transit

     

    $12.5 Million

     

    Sidewalk Snow Clearing

    Clearing snow and ice on sidewalks to ensure residents can safely use the 2,400km of sidewalks across the city 

     

    $2.135 Million 

     

    Sidewalk maintenance

    Sidewalk repair program to eliminate tripping hazards on sidewalks 

     

    $700K

     

    Bike Parking Installation

    2022 will be phase 2 of the bike parking program to ensure residents have a place to park their bikes when using active transportation networks

     

    $7.2 million

    Road Safety Action Plan

    This program funds the 2022 initiatives identified under the 2020-2024 Strategic Road Safety Action Plan (SRSAP).  The SRSAP identifies priority areas for road safety, along with countermeasures and initiatives that can be implemented to address associated collision types. Priority areas have been identified using a data driven approach and associated countermeasures and initiatives to enhance safety and have been developed in consultation with key stakeholders and align with safe system principles of road safety (Vision Zero).   

     

    Plan has an emphasis on vulnerable road users which includes improvements to pedestrian and cycling facilities. Other emphasis areas which improve making roads safer for motorists also improves safety for pedestrians and cyclists which in turn encourages active transportation

     

    $2.557 million

    New Traffic Control Devices

    Annual growth within the City affects both traffic and pedestrian movement to the point that some locations meet the Provincial warrants for the installation of either a traffic control signal or a pedestrian signal. For locations that meet the warrants, this program provides for the installation of the associated traffic control device including any related intersection modifications. Roundabouts are considered in the design process as an alternative means of providing traffic control and are implemented where appropriate. The program funds the applicable portion of the data collection program, assessment of traffic and pedestrian volumes versus Provincial warrants for the justification of signalization, the design of intersections at which modifications are required for effective traffic operation and any associated communication required to support them. Candidate locations are reassessed and ranked annually.

     

    Installation of signals, pedestrian signals and roundabouts improves safety for vulnerable users and as such encourages use of alternative modes of transportation

    $2.414 million

    Street Lighting Major Replacements  

    This program provides the installation of new/upgraded street lights and street light plant to address deficiencies from aging infrastructure. The program also includes the retrofitting of existing lighting with new technologies and asset data capture. These installations are in accordance with current City of Ottawa lighting policies and practices. The deficiencies include approximately 50 km of old, direct buried street light cable that is at the end of its lifecycle and requires replacement; concrete street light poles that are showing signs of degradation; and power supply cabinets that are deteriorating due to environmental factors. The rehabilitation work will reduce the overall operating costs of the lighting systems and improve pedestrian and vehicular safety. In addition, Hydro Ottawa has initiated a pole replacement program which necessitates Street Lighting make modifications to its existing plant. This work includes coordination with hydro utility for planning; design of modifications to the street lighting system in the affected areas; installation of temporary overhead wiring to allow for new construction; reuse of the existing street lighting plant where practical; and energizing the new service disconnects and updating the design records.

     

    Replacement/repair of streetlighting that is damaged/not working provides better lighting conditions which in turn improves road safety. Better roadway lighting encourages use active modes.

    $1.712 million

    Traffic & Pedestrian Safety Enhancement Program

    2022 Traffic & Pedestrian Safety Enhancement Program - Ward Initiatives

    Traffic Services works collaboratively with each Ward Councillor to identify sites for the enhancement of road safety through the installation of temporary traffic calming measures. Examples of treatments covered by the program include:

    • Speed display boards (permanent or temporary);

    • Pavement markings such as speed limits, “School/École”, “Slow/Lent”;

    • Flexible centreline signage and Cycling delineators;

    • Community entrance signage, gateway speed limit signage, informal "Do not Block Driveway" signs, and permanent “Slow Down for Us” signage;

    • Planters on local streets to create chicanes; 

    • Flexible posts to create bulb outs or chicanes;

    • Warranted Pedestrian Crossovers; 

    • Permanent Speed Humps or speed tables; 

    • Median narrowing islands or pedestrian refuge islands.

    Locations will be identified in consultation with Ward Councillors in Q4 2021 and Q1 2022.

     

    Implementation of temporary traffic calming measures to improve pedestrian safety encourages alternate modes of transportation.

    $637k

    Accessible Pedestrian Signal/Pedestrian Countdown Signals

    Currently there are 1,195 traffic control signals in Ottawa and 1,041 locations are equipped with audible pedestrian signal features and 1,068 are equipped with Pedestrian Countdown Signals (PCS). Staff currently equip all new traffic control signals and those undergoing major rehabilitation with PCS and Accessible Pedestrian Signals (APS) to comply with the Design of Public Spaces Standards of the Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act, 2005 (AODA). The cost to install APS and PCS in these cases are absorbed within the associated capital project. This annual Accessible Pedestrian Signal / Pedestrian Countdown Signal Program also funds the retrofit of existing traffic control signals with accessible pedestrian devices, at locations specifically requested by pedestrians with disabilities or through community groups. This program was created out of Council direction from Report ACS2009-CCV-AAC-0002.  

     

    Implementation of these types of signals encourages use of active modes by all residents.

    $530k

    Pedestrian Crossover Program

    The Pedestrian Crossover Program supports the installation of pedestrian crossovers (PXOs) as a type of traffic control in Ottawa. Crossovers and their associated crosswalks are located at low speed, low-medium volume intersections, midblock and at roundabouts. They provide pedestrians the right of way over vehicles when crossing the road. The program’s processes and criteria are established based on Provincial regulations to address warrants, to determine PXO locations and to select the appropriate type of PXO. The program complements other sustainable transportation programs, promotes walking as a form of transportation and exercise, supports accessibility, enhances senior mobility and is relied upon by OSTA for children's active transportation to and from school.  

     

    PXOs give pedestrians the right of way over vehicles to safely cross the road. PXOs encourages the safe mobility of all residents

     

     

    $403k

    Pedestrian Safety Evaluation Program

    Pedestrian safety is an integral component of the City's road safety strategy. The Pedestrian Safety Evaluation Program (PSEP) is a customized process that combines traffic engineering with public engagement, for prioritizing and programming pedestrian

    related road safety improvements to signalized and non-signalized intersections. Intersections are ranked based on risk to pedestrians, collision history, and public feedback. The goal of this program is to mitigate the frequency and severity of preventable collisions involving pedestrians, by providing guidance in the selection of cost-effective countermeasures. The PSEP is used in conjunction with the current Safety Improvement Program (SIP) studies, in the preliminary design stages of capital rehabilitation projects. Service Enhancement funding will enable the program to have a greater impact on the safety and mobility of pedestrians, with the ability to implement geometric modifications to one of the highest ranked locations every year. Locations identified for modifications will be selected annually as per the existing program.

     

    Program goal is to reduce the frequency and severity of preventable collisions involving pedestrians.

    $200k

    Pedestrian Access-Intersection & Ramp

    To support planning, design and implementation of accessible pedestrian facilities that are not captured through road reconstruction or development projects. The program removes obstructions and installs short sections of sidewalks, multi-use pathways, curb ramps, TWSIs (Tactile Walking Surface Indicators), and AODA upgrades at intersections, bus stops and mid block crossings, while bringing facilities in line with current accessibility design standards and legislation. Locations are prioritized based on opportunities to coordinate with other capital works projects, technical feasibility, and community need (e.g. links to public transit, schools, parks and other destinations).

     

    An increase in accessible pedestrian facilities encourages alternative modes.

    $1,071 million

    Safety Improvement Program

    This project funds the Safety Improvement Program (SIP) which monitors 15,000 reported traffic collisions annually in order to identify locations with existing road safety issues based on collision trends. The program undertakes roadway modifications at these locations to help improve road safety performance of the City's transportation network.

     

    Roadway modifications which enhance safety encourages alternate modes.

    $111k

    Cycling Safety Program

    The Cycling Safety Improvement Program (CSIP) ensures a well-defined process which combines traffic engineering, observed behaviours, and risk mitigation measures to enable on-going road safety improvements, for benefit to cyclists within the City of Ottawa. Since 2012, Traffic Services staff have been coordinating the CSIP, focusing on identifying problem locations, making recommendations for improvements, and proposing a process for continuous improvement of cycling safety. Proposed recommendations to enhance specific locations are identified following consultation with members of the public and occasionally through project specific Working Groups. The goal is to improve 10 locations per year, by way of installing pavement markings and signs, or implementing minor geometric changes to the roadway   

     

    The program seeks to implement road safety improvements, for benefit to cyclists.

     

    $446k

    Safer Roads Ottawa

    Safer Roads Ottawa (SRO) is a leading community partnership between Fire Services, Ottawa Paramedic Service, Ottawa Police Service, Ottawa Public Health, the Transit Services Department, Public Works and Environmental Services Department and a variety of community based organizations.  All of the partners are committed to preventing or eliminating road deaths and serious injuries for all people in the City of Ottawa, through culture change, community engagement, and development of a sustainable safe transportation environment.

     

              

    Investments in culture change, community engagement and the development of a sustainable safe transportation environment encourages alternative mods.

     

    $486k

    Automated Speed Enforcement Camera Installation

    This project provides the funding to implement the City’s portion of the physical infrastructure required to implement automated speed enforcement cameras at 9 sites in 2022.

     

    ASE have proven successful at reducing traffic speeds where they are installed, which is in areas near schools (locations are selected based on a Council-approved data-driven approach). Lower speeds decrease the potential for collisions and reduces the severity of collisions.

     $125K 

    Adult School Crossing Guards

    Adult Crossing Guard Program assesses and implements school crossing guards where warranted under the City’s School Zone Traffic Safety Program policy. Guards are managed by the Ottawa Safety Council under City direction. Adult School Crossing Guards at 10 new locations in 2022.

     

    in operating for the ASCG Program for the implementation of 10 new locations in 2022.






     

    Additionally, $11.5 million has been dedicated million for the renewal of sidewalks and pathways.

     

    Thank you for your interest in the City of Ottawa’s 2022 budget.

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    We live in Ward 1 and are aware that, since the unwanted forced-on-us amalgamation, a very high % of our taxes go to the City Core and other areas of Ottawa, and not to Orleans. This is not right and very unjust on us, suckers of Ottawa's money grab. We've seen this in the past 20 years with huge tax increases (many times over the cost of living, the increase of our salaries and pensions) and very little services received in Ward 1. What can be done so that Ward 1 receive its fair share (and that should be retroactively). Please don't answer OCTranspo improvements (60% or more don't want OCTranspo cash cow and are sick of paying for 18+ months for empty buses (mostly costly double-deckers and articulated buses) that belch pollution at high cost to us). As well, we're sick and disgusted to hear LRT (80%+ of folks never wanted it), the worst lemon in the hundreds of world cities we visited. I was told that Watson never successfully completed a project in his career; I believe this. RSVP and I don't want to have to deal with Ward 1 Councillor Luloff, the worst, most arrogant, lying and impolite Councillor that Ward 1 ever had. Totally useless!

    cdnmike asked about 1 year ago

    Thank you for your inquiry regarding Budget 2022.

     

    The following is a summary of recent and proposed Ward 1 investments:

     

    Ward investments in 2022

     

    Infrastructure  

    • $270,000 to construct the Jeanne d’Arc Boulevard North culvert east of Trim Road 
    • $278,000 to design pathways, including in North Vineyard Park west of Jeanne d’Arc Boulevard North, and in Saint-Louis Woods between Hiawatha Park Road and Bilberry Drive 
    • $140,000 to resurface Jeanne d’Arc Boulevard North, west of Bilberry Drive 
    • $165,000 to resurface the Highway 174 eastbound off ramp at Jeanne d’Arc Boulevard 

     

    Transportation 

    • $54,000 to install an automated speed enforcement camera on Tenth Line Road between Amiens Street and Des Épinettes Avenue 
    • $1 million to build a roundabout at Frank Kenny and Innes roads 
    • $50,000 for temporary traffic calming measures 
    • Improve pedestrian facilities on Wilkie Drive north of Chenier Way  

     

    Parks and Facilities 

    • $120,000 to replace fire alarm panels and rink lights at the Bob MacQuarrie Recreation Complex 
    • $190,000 to replace asphalt walkways at Father Richard Ward Park 
    • $160,000 to replace asphalt on the basketball courts at Luc Major Park 
    • $30,000 to design the senior play structure at South West Park 
    • $280,000 to replace return air units at the Ray Friel Recreation Complex 
    • $400,000 to build Montfort Parkette  
    • $318,000 to build Roger Montpetit Park 
    • $30,000 to install lighting at the Champlain Street entrance to Roger Montpetit Park 

     

    Ward projects underway

     

    Infrastructure 

    • $5 million to upgrade the Cumberland Pumping Station  
    • $500,000 to rehabilitate asphalt pathways, including east of Caprihani Way near Trim Road, between McEachern Crescent and Bourcier Drive, and between Tenth Line Road and Thurlow Street 

     

    Transportation 

    • Design a roundabout at Frank Kenny and Innes roads 
    • Install a pedestrian crossover at St. Joseph and Jeanne d'Arc boulevards 
    • Install a red-light camera at Jeanne d'Arc Boulevard and Fortune/Vineyard drives 
    • Conduct a traffic calming study on Bilberry Drive 
    • Improve intersection control at Portobello Boulevard and Valin Street 

     

    Transit 

    • Continue building Stage 2 LRT, extending service east by 12 kilometres and five stations, west by 15 kilometres and 11 stations, and south by 12 kilometres and eight stations with a link to the Ottawa International Airport 

     

    Parks and Facilities 

    • $650,000 to improve accessibility at the Bob MacQuarrie Recreation Complex 
    • $450,000 to improve the customer service counter at the Ray Friel Recreation Complex  
    • $750,000 to develop an east end district skate park at the Bob MacQuarrie Recreation Complex 
    • $3,000 to install two new baseball foul posts at Pierre Rocque Park  
    • $350,000 for upgrades to a picnic shelter at Queenswood Ridge Park  
    • $22,000 for bulletin boards at four community associations 

     

    Environment 

    • $370,000 to install sewer flow monitoring systems at the Orléans Shafts site 

     

    Housing  

    • $15,000 through the Ontario Renovates program to repair and modify homes to support independent living for low-income seniors and people with disabilities 

     

    Recently completed ward projects 

     

    Infrastructure  

    • $470,000 to resurface St. George's Street between Des Épinettes Avenue and Galloway Drive  
    • $920,000 to replace the Bilberry Creek culvert at Mystery Park 

     

    Transportation 

    • Installed pedestrian crossover at Orléans Boulevard west of Broken Oak Drive  
    • Installed red-light camera at Champlain Street and Jeanne d’Arc Boulevard 

     

    Parks and Facilities  

    • $1 million to replace four sections of roof at the Bob MacQuarrie Recreation Complex 
    • $78,000 to complete a pool climbing wall at the Bob MacQuarrie Recreation Complex  
    • $8,000 to build a play structure at Trillium Elementary School  
    • $39,000 to replace HVAC unit at the Orléans-Cumberland Community Resource Centre

     

    Additionally, we encourage you to look at information that is available on Ottawa.ca to see how the City of Ottawa compares with other Canadian municipalities with regard to property tax increases since 2011. You may notice that Ottawa has the lowest compounded property tax increase over this period compared to Toronto, Vancouver, Calgary and Edmonton.

     

    Finally, you may wish to attend the Ward 1 session on Tuesday, October 26 from 6:30pm to 8:30pm. Any concerns that you have regarding the allocation of property tax dollars to Ward 1 can be discussed in this forum, or by e-mailing your Councillor directly. Information on accessing this budget consultation session is also available on Ottawa.ca.

     

    Thank you again for your inquiry, and for your interest in Budget 2022.

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    Water rates have increased a total of 26.6% over the past five years compared to a national inflation rate of 8.23% for the same period. This is getting unaffordable and what are the specific cost reduction measures the City is considering?

    Legion32 asked about 1 year ago

    Thank you for your inquiry on the City’s budget. 

     

    Water services are highly capital intensive, requiring significant annual capital spending to rehabilitate and maintain the City’s substantial infrastructure investment. The water infrastructure includes water mains, pumping stations, and filtration plants, and the sewer infrastructure includes trunk and collector sewers, pumping stations, and the treatment plant. Conservation of this infrastructure is ongoing, and costs represent the revenue needed to deliver reliable drinking water and wastewater services to all residents of the City of Ottawa. The water, wastewater, and stormwater costs are completely funded through water billing. The updated water rate structure ensures that all users contribute to the fixed costs of delivering clean water. 

     

    The budgeted water, wastewater and stormwater rates are presented and determined in accordance with the 2017 Long-Range Financial Plan (LRFP) V – Water, Wastewater and Stormwater Supported Programs. This report aims to offer a ten-year outlook of the rate supported capital requirements for the delivery of water, wastewater and stormwater services in support of these essential services recognizing that the assets last for multiple generations. The Long-Range Financial Plan (LRFP V) aligns the increases to the overall operating and capital requirements of delivering these services. The report provides for a $2.6 billion investment that are funded by cash and debt, the cost of which must be fully recovered by water bill revenues.

     

    This service is very capital intensive and the inflation rate for capital is much different from the consumer price index. Over the past several years, the average construction price index has been 5.8% and 2.3%. The rate increases also include a factor for addressing the infrastructure gap over five years and revenue to fund the associated operating costs. Further, the report outlines the scheduled increases which are smoothed over a ten-year period to provide predictability to ratepayers. 

     

    Thank you

Page last updated: 24 Nov 2022, 04:21 PM