Community Safety and Well-Being Plan

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Everyone has a role to play in safety and well-being, and the City of Ottawa is seeking your feedback as we develop Ottawa’s Community Safety and Well-Being Plan. The plan, which is required under the Province’s Safer Ontario Act, 2018, will outline strategies and actions to improve safety and well-being for everyone in Ottawa. We have been listening to the community on the best ways for residents, organizations and government to work together to address well-being and safety issues in our communities.

Your voice matters! We’ve heard from hundreds of residents and stakeholders since the project began through in person and virtual meetings, email, community toolkits, perception polling, online survey and story feature. The current consultation period is now closed but there will be future opportunities to share your ideas.

All feedback from this consultation period has been analyzed and is now summarized in the CSWB “What We Heard” report. Additionally, the CSWB Interim Report will be presented to Community and Protective Services Committee on October 15. (see links in the ‘Updates’ tab below)

Sign up for project updates to learn more about the Plan as it is developed, including future engagement activities.  

Everyone has a role to play in safety and well-being, and the City of Ottawa is seeking your feedback as we develop Ottawa’s Community Safety and Well-Being Plan. The plan, which is required under the Province’s Safer Ontario Act, 2018, will outline strategies and actions to improve safety and well-being for everyone in Ottawa. We have been listening to the community on the best ways for residents, organizations and government to work together to address well-being and safety issues in our communities.

Your voice matters! We’ve heard from hundreds of residents and stakeholders since the project began through in person and virtual meetings, email, community toolkits, perception polling, online survey and story feature. The current consultation period is now closed but there will be future opportunities to share your ideas.

All feedback from this consultation period has been analyzed and is now summarized in the CSWB “What We Heard” report. Additionally, the CSWB Interim Report will be presented to Community and Protective Services Committee on October 15. (see links in the ‘Updates’ tab below)

Sign up for project updates to learn more about the Plan as it is developed, including future engagement activities.  

Tell your story

Thank you for your feedback! The story feature is now closed.  All feedback from this consultation period is being analyzed and will be summarized in a “What we Heard” report, anticipated to be released this summer.  

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If we are successful at addressing local priorities through a Community Safety and Well-Being Plan, how would Ottawa be different in the future? Be specific and let us know what would make you and your community feel safer and improve your sense of well-being.

Feel free to upload photos or videos of your experiences, we want to see your great ideas! Your feedback will be included in our analysis, and development of our future priorities.

We want to hear from you! – Open until the end of June

This conversation will be moderated, please be sensitive to others with your commentary.

Thank you for contributing your story on Community Safety and Well-Being. 

Your feedback is one input in setting priorities for our future community Plan and a way for us to learn what is most important to you. 

If you have any questions, contact us at CSWB/SBEC@ottawa.ca and a team member would be pleased to call or email you back.

CLOSED: This discussion has concluded.
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    Abolish the polish and put money to what is necessary for improvement within communities

    by Mayumi, 4 months ago

    We have to face the truth that the police has never made citizens feel safe. There are numerous stories about police brutality, and cops' tendencies to abuse their power within the city. I've had a close friend harassed by a group of police officers. He was grabbed and pushed against a wall, punched to the point his mouth bled, due to profiling and stereotyping. He was 17 years old.. and he was just walking home, in the streets of a supposedly "bad" neighbourhood. A neighbourhood which has a drug problem, and a big population of impoverished and marginalized groups.

    Why... Continue reading

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    Defund the police and invest in our communities

    by JusticeinOtt, 4 months ago

    Ottawa touts itself as a city that celebrates diversity, yet could certainly do better by its BIPOC citizens. As a white woman I have had the immense privilege of largely feeling safe in my city. This past weekend I had the opportunity to watch a forum hosted by the Criminalization and Punishment Education Project (CPEP) that featured the voices of BICOP community leaders, and many concerned citizens. Panelists were invited to share their experiences dealing with police in Ottawa, and to reimagine a safer Ottawa. Many panelists agreed that when their own safety was at risk, officers had exacerbated and... Continue reading

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    Defund, Disarm, and Dismantle the OPS

    by dominic, 4 months ago

    The abundant resources for the OPS to provide services poorly and with negative consequences must be reallocated to other providers. The negative effect that the OPS has had on countless Ottawans must stop and we must move to more effective solutions that do not rely on the police. There is obviously something very wrong if an institution meant to make us feel safe strikes fear in us instead. Acknowledge that by defunding the OPS with the ultimate goal of abolition. We must do better.

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    Fund community services, address root causes of crime, increase training, reduce weapons

    by CC85, 4 months ago

    How is it that our city spends almost 20% of taxpayer dollars on funding the police, comparable to the amount spent on public health, paramedics, the library, social housing, parks and recreation, and employment services combined?

    When you have a hammer, every problem looks like a nail, the saying goes, and the police department is too often the immediate reflex in responding to delicate issues that require a more sensitive approach.

    Please reallocate police funding to:

    • mental health support
    • addressing poverty and homelessness
    • harm reduction (incl. safe consumption sites)
    • de-escalation training (regular intervals)
    • anti-oppression training (regular intervals)
    • require more than... Continue reading

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    Safer Communities through Defunding and Abolishing the Ottawa Police Services

    by mar.khorkhordina, 4 months ago

    The Ottawa police take up the most social spending out of all services, and yet cause the most harm to our communities. For decades, Black, brown, and Indigenous, people of colour have advocated for ways in which the police continue to actively harm, target, and over-police their communities. Countless stories of violence and trauma that could not fill the characters allowed in this story feature. The call here that I echo today is that of generations, that of my fellow community members, and that for the immediate investment in safer communities by defunding and abolishing the Ottawa Police Services.

    In... Continue reading

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    Invest in Community, Public Transit, Environment - Divest & Disarm Police

    by GreenTea, 4 months ago

    A city that gives me the greatest sense of safety invests in health and well-being of ALL residents (and their communities). This includes spending on social services, education, affordable programming for children and youth, affordable housing, mental health supports (crisis and long-term), public transit, and green spaces AND divesting the police of their excessive funding, weapons and unaccountable power. Universal basic income is something I would love to see in the city of Ottawa.

    It's shameful that so much of the city's budget is allocated to police, and the ways we allow use of force by police to avoid dealing... Continue reading

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    Defund the police and invest in community social programs

    by ESams, 4 months ago

    Ottawa would be safer for victims of sexual violence and intimate partner violence if we did not rely so heavily on the police. Modern and current policing systems are built with the white, cishetereopatriarchy deeply ingrained in their systems. Ottawa police continued to fail victims by turning them away or creating unsafe conditions for someone to report. Defunding the police would mean more money for community safety practises that address the cause, such as homelessness, and lack of proper social systems. Housing is a community safety issue. Invest in women’s shelters and homeless shelters to support victims who have to... Continue reading

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    Defund the police and invest in communities

    by m.m12, 4 months ago

    The current system we have does not keep communities safe, especially those already made vulnerable by the numerous factors such as race, gender and class. The OPS has shown how violent and harmful they can be and reforms are not enough. We have seen that investing in body cameras, civilian reviews or de-escalation and implicit bias training doesn’t work. Are BIPOC lives not worth considering a new way of approaching community safety? I believe they are so I encourage you to rethink how we keep communities. What we need in Ottawa is leadership that can initiate a reduction in the... Continue reading

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    More funding to community services!

    by megan3318, 4 months ago

    In light of recent events in both the U.S. and as a First Nations individual, I believe it would be incredibly beneficial for our city to put more funding into community services. This includes affordable housing, easy access mental health services, homeless shelters, and others to support those in need. These services, additionally, should be culture-specific to provide the best support possible.

    Many homeless people are racial minorities, and often are mentally unwell. Whenever I have seen someone in an episode of psychosis, there is nothing that can be done other than to call the police. Best case scenario, the... Continue reading

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    Defund the police and invest in community resources

    by victoriavilla, 4 months ago

    I'm only able to comment on my own experiences with community resource underfunding, but I'm unfortunate enough to have a few.

    When I was younger, I was struggling with an eating disorder. I needed help badly, however there were so few spots in the mental health department at CHEO that this process took months, and I got lucky. While waiting months for a consultation, and then several more until spots opened, my condition worsened. I was only able to get in so fast (by fast, I mean 5 months wait time) because I had previously been inpatient for mental health... Continue reading

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